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Ch 11: SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Figures of Speech

About This Chapter

Our user-friendly video lessons can aid your students' review for the English language arts portion of the 6-8 SBA (Smarter Balanced Assessment). If you wish, you can have them take the short quiz that accompanies each lesson to check their progress in reviewing figures of speech for test day.

SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Figures of Speech - Chapter Summary

Familiarity with figures of speech can support strong reading comprehension skills. Use this handy collection of lessons to review related topics for the SBA ELA (Smarter Balanced Assessment English Language Arts). Your middle school students will look at some of the more familiar figures of speech like simile, metaphor, alliteration and pun, but also dive into the more obscure examples, such as equivocation, oxymoron and synecdoche. The following topics are included in this study of figurative language:

  • Understanding figures of speech in written and spoken language
  • Comparing illusion and allusion
  • Onomatopoeia, synonym and euphemism
  • Difference between assonance, repetition and consonance
  • Litotes and understatement
  • Comparison of metonymy and synecdoche

Our short video lessons are presented by experienced instructors and offer full transcripts, self-assessment quizzes and a chapter test. Lessons may be used as many times as desired, and video tags can help students locate just the right spot in presentations if there's a topic that needs a little more attention.

15 Lessons in Chapter 11: SBA ELA - Grades 6-8: Figures of Speech
What Is a Figure of Speech?

1. What Is a Figure of Speech?

In this lesson, we will define figure of speech and explain why it is important in your writing. After this definition, we will examine the more common figure of speeches and look at some examples.

Interpreting Figures of Speech in Context

2. Interpreting Figures of Speech in Context

Figures of speech can add humor or drama to any situation, but you have to understand what they mean in order to connect the dots. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to interpret figures of speech, such as verbal irony, puns, idioms, and hyperbole.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

3. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

Alliteration: Definition & Examples

4. Alliteration: Definition & Examples

Alliteration is a figure of speech used to create rhythm and bring focus to a line or sentence in a piece of written material. Learn about the definition of alliteration, see examples of alliteration and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Onomatopoeia in Literature: Definition & Examples

5. Onomatopoeia in Literature: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will explore onomatopoeia, one way that poets convey sound. When a poet uses onomatopoeia, the word, itself, looks like the sound it makes, and somehow we 'hear' it as we read.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

6. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

7. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

8. Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the different ways authors repeat consonant and vowel sounds in their literary works. Learn about how writers use repeated words and phrases with well-known examples.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

9. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Using Synonyms, Antonyms & Analogies to Improve Understanding

10. Using Synonyms, Antonyms & Analogies to Improve Understanding

In this lesson, you'll explore your three best friends when it comes to understanding difficult words: antonyms, synonyms, and analogies. Then, test your knowledge of these three buddies with a quiz.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

11. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

How to Recognize and Use Oxymorons

12. How to Recognize and Use Oxymorons

In this lesson, we will define the figure of speech called an oxymoron and look at several examples. We will then discuss how to recognize oxymorons and use them correctly in writing.

Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

13. Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

Would you lend your ears for a moment (or at least your eyeballs)? This lesson will explain what synecdoche and metonymy mean and how to spot them in a piece of prose or poetry.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

14. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

Pun in Literature: Definition & Examples

15. Pun in Literature: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll briefly review figurative language. Furthermore, we'll look closer at one type of figurative language: the pun. You'll be able to analyze some examples of the pun and see why it's used.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Smarter Balanced Assessments - ELA Grades 6-8: Test Prep & Practice course

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