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Ch 10: Sectional Crisis (1850-1861): Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Sectional Crisis (1850-1861) chapter of this AP US History Homework Help course helps students complete their sectional crisis homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your sectional crisis homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your sectional crisis homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Tensions related to slavery
  • Major issues of James Buchanan's presidency
  • The raid at Harper's Ferry
  • Lincoln-Douglas debates
  • Lincoln's election
  • Southern succession and the formation of the Confederacy
  • Start of the Civil War

9 Lessons in Chapter 10: Sectional Crisis (1850-1861): Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

1. Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

In the 1850s, Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, 'Uncle Tom's Cabin,' detailed the injustices of slavery. Learn how this book, along with the Missouri Compromise and the Fugitive Slave Act, helped spur the United States into Civil War and the end of slavery on U.S. soil.

Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

2. Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

The term 'Bleeding Kansas' refers to the violence surrounding the issue of slavery in the Kansas territory. Learn about the tension between slave states and free states, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, who Charles Sumner was, and the cause and effects of Bloody Kansas.

Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

3. Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

In the court case Dred Scott v. Sanford, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that blacks (free or slaves) were not citizens and had no constitutional rights. Learn about the Dred Scott decision, President James Buchanan, and how these events led a divided America to the brink of the Civil War.

John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

4. John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

John Brown was an abolitionist who led an attack on Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Explore how the division between the North and the South and the election of Abraham Lincoln caused rumors of war, and discover John Brown's role in the fight against slavery.

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

5. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

In 1858, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas competed for a U.S. Senate seat and met for a series of seven debates. Learn who Lincoln and Douglas were, and explore the issues they discussed in their debates. Understand why these debates were significant and review Lincoln's House Divided Speech.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

6. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Four political parties contended for the presidency during the 1860 Presidential election. Abraham Lincoln won the election with 40% of the popular vote and became the 16th President of America. Learn about the 1860 Presidential election and the events that led to the formation of the Confederate States of America.

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

7. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

The Civil War was triggered when South Carolina's militia attacked Fort Sumter. Learn about the crisis at Fort Sumter, explore the Battle of Fort Sumter, including Fort Sumter's fall, and understand how this became the start of the Civil War.

Millard Fillmore: Presidency, Facts & Accomplishments

8. Millard Fillmore: Presidency, Facts & Accomplishments

Millard Fillmore was the thirteenth president of the United States. Learn about his early political career, his presidency, and his political engagement after his presidency.

Who Was Stephen Douglas? - Facts, Debates & Timeline

9. Who Was Stephen Douglas? - Facts, Debates & Timeline

Vermont-born Stephen Douglas was a senator from his adopted state of Illinois. Learn about Stephen Douglas, examine the political mistakes he made that brought the nation closer to civil war, and study his debates with Abraham Lincoln.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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