Ch 31: Sectionalism & the American Civil War

About This Chapter

This chapter on sectionalism and the American Civil War can expand your understanding of Dred Scott v. Sanford, President Abraham Lincoln's re-election, and more. These lessons can assist you with getting prepared to take an exam or confidently join in a class discussion.

Sectionalism & the American Civil War - Chapter Summary

In this chapter on sectionalism and the American Civil War, engaging lessons observe the contentious 1860 presidential race and formation of the Confederate States of America. You can also get a deeper understanding of dynamics that led to the American Civil War. After going through the lessons, you should be able to do the following:

  • Discuss how sectionalism divided the nation
  • Explain how the Dred Scott decision affected slavery in the United States
  • Recall the price that John Brown paid for his abolitionist beliefs
  • Describe how Abraham Lincoln's election led to the secession of South Carolina and six other states
  • Discuss the impact of the American Civil War
  • Recall strategies used by the Union and the Confederacy during the war
  • Explain the prisoner exchange system
  • Detail how Abraham Lincoln was pitted against General George McClellan

These lessons will help you grasp key concepts related to sectionalism and the American Civil War, and you can submit questions to our instructors if you need help with anything covered. A short quiz can test your remembrance of each lesson, and the quizzes can be printed. The quizzes link to specific topics in the video lessons, so if you get a question wrong you can easily go back and review that topic.

8 Lessons in Chapter 31: Sectionalism & the American Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sectionalism in U.S. History: Definition & Conflict

1. Sectionalism in U.S. History: Definition & Conflict

How did the United States end up in a bloody civil war? In this lesson, we are going to explore the rising sectionalism that divided the nation in almost every way possible across the 40 years leading up to the Civil War.

Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

2. Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

The Dred Scott decision was one of the most important turning points in the debate over slavery in the United States. It came during the presidency of James Buchanan, a man well qualified but ill suited for the job of keeping the nation together. This lesson discusses both as we attempt to understand the dynamics that led to the American Civil War.

John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

3. John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

John Brown was a man of strong convictions - so strong that he was willing to fight, to kill, and to die for them. These abolitionist beliefs led him from Kansas to Virginia, where he would pay the ultimate price. This lesson tells that story.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

4. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

American Civil War: Facts, Causes & Effects

5. American Civil War: Facts, Causes & Effects

In this lesson, we will examine the American Civil War. We will explore the causes leading to the outbreak of war, examine key battles and developments, and analyze the impact of this horrible war.

Comparing Union & Confederate Civil War Strategies

6. Comparing Union & Confederate Civil War Strategies

Learn about the different strategies that the Union and the Confederacy used during the American Civil War, and how those strategies reflected their political goals.

The Politics of War: Legislation & Executive Actions

7. The Politics of War: Legislation & Executive Actions

This lesson will explore the laws and executive actions the U.S. and Confederate governments used to support the war effort. We will also discuss the prisoner exchange system and the political opposition to the war on both sides.

The Politics of 1864: President Abraham Lincoln is Re-Elected

8. The Politics of 1864: President Abraham Lincoln is Re-Elected

In this lesson, we will explore the turbulent political landscape of 1864, focusing especially on that year's presidential campaign that pitted incumbent Abraham Lincoln against General George McClellan.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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