Copyright

Ch 3: Setting Up the Research Study: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Setting Up the Research Study chapter of this Research Methods in Psychology Homework Help course helps students complete their research study organization homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your research study setup homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your research study setup homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Selecting a research problem
  • Choosing a research method and design
  • Writing research questions
  • Determining the research hypothesis and null hypothesis
  • Differentiating between inductive and deductive reasoning
  • Identifying research variables
  • Using the literature review process
  • Examining primary and secondary research
  • Defining samples and populations in research
  • Choosing a data collection technique

16 Lessons in Chapter 3: Setting Up the Research Study: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Selecting a Problem to Research

1. Selecting a Problem to Research

This lesson explores the process, pitfalls, and requirements for selecting a good problem to research. There is a bit more to it than just having a good idea.

How to Choose a Research Method & Design

2. How to Choose a Research Method & Design

After a researcher has something they want to study, what is the process of figuring out how to study it? This lesson explores most of the elements involved in selecting and designing an experiment.

Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

3. Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

What is a research question, and why is it important to get it right? This lesson will explore one way to write a research question, which guides a researcher in designing his or her experiment.

Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

4. Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

After figuring out what you want to study, what is the next step in designing a research experiment? You, the researcher, write a hypothesis and null hypothesis. This lesson explores the process and terminology used in writing a hypothesis and null hypothesis.

Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

5. Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

This lesson explores the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning in the form of psychological experiments. In addition to defining these terms, the lesson gives examples to explain how this reasoning is applied.

Research Variables: Dependent, Independent, Control, Extraneous & Moderator

6. Research Variables: Dependent, Independent, Control, Extraneous & Moderator

This lesson explores the terminology of experimental design. What are variables? How do they influence each other? Is it possible that you are seeing connections that don't actually exist?

The Literature Review Process

7. The Literature Review Process

Literature review is a process of looking at what research has been done in a specific field of study. In this lesson, we will explore how to work through the process of performing and writing a literature review.

Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

8. Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

Differentiating between different types of research articles is useful when looking at what has already been done. In this lesson, we explore some of the different types of research articles out there and when they would be used.

Samples & Populations in Research: Definition

9. Samples & Populations in Research: Definition

When planning an experiment, you will likely use groups of participants. This lesson explores the types of groups an experimenter can collect data from and the reason why there are different groups.

Strategies for Choosing a Data Collection Technique

10. Strategies for Choosing a Data Collection Technique

After figuring out what you are going to study, you, as the researcher, will need to figure out how to study it. This lesson discusses popular ways a researcher can collect data as well as why a researcher would chose a particular data collection technique.

The Major Sections of a Research Study According to APA

11. The Major Sections of a Research Study According to APA

This lesson explores how the American Psychological Association recommends research articles and projects be set up. Each section is sufficiently explained to increase familiarity with the pieces of a research article.

Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

12. Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

What is the process after you have completed your research? In this lesson, we will explore the differences between a finished piece of research and a published piece of research, why it is important, and the process of how it is accomplished.

Correlational Studies in Psychology: Examples, Advantages & Types

13. Correlational Studies in Psychology: Examples, Advantages & Types

This lesson describes correlational studies, or the measurement of the relationship between variables. These variables can occur in a variety of settings and are not controlled by the researcher.

Double-Blind Study: Definition & Explanation

14. Double-Blind Study: Definition & Explanation

Double-blind studies are an important part of conducting research. Learn how double-blind studies contribute to the validity of research by reducing the biases of research participants and the experimenters themselves.

General Social Survey: History and Uses

15. General Social Survey: History and Uses

There are a variety of tools available to researchers. The NORC's General Social Survey is one such tool, useful for information on the changing state of American and world societies.

What is a Case Study? - Research & Examples

16. What is a Case Study? - Research & Examples

Where does all the information about our health and behavior come from? Scientists do very structured forms of research. While most forms of research require many, even thousands of human subjects, case studies are the exception. They may be about one person.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support