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Ch 3: Setting Up the Research Study: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Setting Up the Research Study chapter of this Research Methods in Psychology Homework Help course helps students complete their research study organization homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your research study setup homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your research study setup homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Selecting a research problem
  • Choosing a research method and design
  • Writing research questions
  • Determining the research hypothesis and null hypothesis
  • Differentiating between inductive and deductive reasoning
  • Identifying research variables
  • Using the literature review process
  • Examining primary and secondary research
  • Defining samples and populations in research
  • Choosing a data collection technique

16 Lessons in Chapter 3: Setting Up the Research Study: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Selecting a Problem to Research

1. Selecting a Problem to Research

Selecting a problem is the foundation of any investigation, so it is important to follow a proper process to find one. Learn what a research problem is and explore the process to find and select the research problem.

How to Choose a Research Method & Design

2. How to Choose a Research Method & Design

Choosing the method under which you will work is an important first step in the research process. Learn more about how to plan an experiment and its procedures, as well as next steps like participants and materials.

Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

3. Writing Research Questions: Purpose & Examples

Research questions are questions you ask at the beginning of writing a research paper. Explore how the purpose of a well-crafted research question is to aid the writer and discover what differentiates research questions from general questions by examining some examples.

Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

4. Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

Generally, research projects are designed to test a hypothesis, which is a statement of the condition to be studied or the question to be answered. Research projects actually prove or disprove a null hypothesis, which states the opposite of the hypothesis. Learn how to formulate the research hypothesis and null hypothesis, including research questions and if/then statements, and understand the concept of invalid hypothesis.

Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

5. Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

Inductive reasoning makes use of evidence to come to a conclusion whereas deductive reasoning finds evidence to support a conclusion. Study the differences and examples of inductive and deductive reasoning that are used to understand science.

Research Variables: Dependent, Independent, Control, Extraneous & Moderator

6. Research Variables: Dependent, Independent, Control, Extraneous & Moderator

In experimental research, factors that have any varying quality or quantity are known as a Variable. Discover the uses of Independent, Dependent, Control, Extraneous, and Moderator variables in conducting research.

The Literature Review Process

7. The Literature Review Process

A literature review is a thorough overview of current research on a topic. Learn the purpose of a literature review and then explore the process, what it looks like, and find tips and tricks to write one well.

Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

8. Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

When conducting research, it is important to consider the difference between primary research--firsthand accounts of the topic or event--and secondary research--the secondhand interpretation of the topic or event. Learn more about the differences between primary and secondary research, when to use which method, and examples of each type.

Samples & Populations in Research: Definition

9. Samples & Populations in Research: Definition

The two groupings of participants in research are population, the entire collection, and sample, a portion of the population. Learn about these concepts, as well as how data from each can represent sets of participants differently.

Strategies for Choosing a Data Collection Technique

10. Strategies for Choosing a Data Collection Technique

Data collection is the process of systematically gathering information, or data, for a research project. Researchers use a variety of techniques for data collection, including experimentation, surveys, archival, and observation. Learn the strategies for choosing a data collection technique for a specific research project, and understand why some techniques are more appropriate than others, depending on the nature of the research.

The Major Sections of a Research Study According to APA

11. The Major Sections of a Research Study According to APA

The American Psychological Association (APA) has established standards for writing major sections of research study. The guidelines and requirements for the following sections are included: title, abstract, introduction and literature review, method, results, discussion, and references.

Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

12. Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

The last step of a research project typically is to submit a final typed report for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Learn about the journal publication process and real-world examples that highlight the differences between published and typed reports.

Correlational Studies in Psychology: Examples, Advantages & Types

13. Correlational Studies in Psychology: Examples, Advantages & Types

Correlational studies in psychology are conducted to determine whether or not two or more variables are related and to what degree. Explore what's a correlational study, discover three common types of correlational research through some examples, and learn how correlational studies can help to determine relationships between variables.

Double-Blind Study: Definition & Explanation

14. Double-Blind Study: Definition & Explanation

In a double-blind study, the researcher and the participants do not know which members belong to the control or experimental group. Understand the difference between the control group and the experimental group, explore the concept behind conducting blind experiments, learn about the definition of double-blind experiments, and know when this type of experiment cannot be used.

General Social Survey: History and Uses

15. General Social Survey: History and Uses

There are a variety of tools available to researchers. The NORC's General Social Survey is one such tool, useful for information on the changing state of American and world societies.

What is a Case Study? - Research & Examples

16. What is a Case Study? - Research & Examples

Psychologists use case studies to learn about small groups and individual people that help them in understanding how the brain works. Explore an in-depth meaning of case studies in research and psychology, and discover a number of examples that illustrate their usefulness.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
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