Ch 5: Significant Battles in 1862: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Significant Battles of 1862 chapter of this Civil War History Homework Help course helps students complete their significant battles of 1862 homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your significant battles of 1862 homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your significant battles of 1862 homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • President Lincoln's cabinet
  • Dynamics of President Davis's cabinet
  • Comparison of the Union and Confederate armies
  • The Anaconda Plan
  • The Battle of Hampton Roads
  • The Battle of Shiloh
  • The fight for the Mississippi River in 1862
  • Events in the Second Battle of Bull Run
  • The Emancipation Proclamation
  • Timeline of the Battle of Fredericksburg

19 Lessons in Chapter 5: Significant Battles in 1862: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
President Lincoln's Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

1. President Lincoln's Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, had a cabinet filled with political rivals and large political personalities whom he relied upon to win the Civil War. Learn how Lincoln adeptly handled the differences and difficulties within his cabinet during his presidency in this video lesson.

President Davis' Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

2. President Davis' Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

Confederate President Jefferson Davis was the only leader the short-lived Confederacy ever had. His Cabinet members struggled to provide him with advice and help during the difficult struggle to keep the Confederacy alive during the Civil War.

Comparing the Union and Confederate Armies: Policies & Members

3. Comparing the Union and Confederate Armies: Policies & Members

Union and Confederate armies were spread out across the nation during the Civil War. They were comprised of soldiers with various reasons for fighting, and had many different factors which influenced their successes and defeats. Learn about both armies and their members in this lesson.

The Anaconda Plan: Civil War Strategy

4. The Anaconda Plan: Civil War Strategy

The Anaconda Plan was a strategy created by Union General Winfield Scott in 1861, early on in the Civil War. It called for strangling the Southern Confederacy, much like an Anaconda. It was never officially adopted by the Union government.

General McClellan, the Army of Potomac & the Peninsula Campaign

5. General McClellan, the Army of Potomac & the Peninsula Campaign

General George McClellan was a leading Union commander in 1862 when he built and then led the Army of the Potomac in an attempt to capture Richmond, Virginia, which resulted in the Peninsula Campaign, stretching from March to August, 1862.

The Blockade and Blockade Runners During the Civil War: Definition & Purpose

6. The Blockade and Blockade Runners During the Civil War: Definition & Purpose

Starting in 1861, the Union blockade was meant to stop Southern commerce and hurt the Confederacy during the Civil War. In response, Confederate blockade runners worked to bring much needed supplies to the struggling Confederacy. Learn about the blockade and blockade runners in this lesson.

The Battle of Hampton Roads: Summary, Causes & Consequences

7. The Battle of Hampton Roads: Summary, Causes & Consequences

The Battle of Hampton Roads was a naval battle that occurred off the coast of Virginia on March 8 and 9, 1862. It featured the ironclad warships the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia, and helped to usher in a new era of naval warfare.

The Battle of Shiloh: Conflict, Outcome & Generals Involved

8. The Battle of Shiloh: Conflict, Outcome & Generals Involved

The Battle of Shiloh was fought on April 6 and 7, 1862. Confederate forces launched a surprise attack against Union troops, but Union forces ultimately hung on and won. There were well over 23,000 casualties in the two days of fighting.

The Fight for the Mississippi River in 1862: Summary & History

9. The Fight for the Mississippi River in 1862: Summary & History

The Mississippi River was key to defeating the Confederacy in the Civil War. Union forces made great strides at controlling the river in 1862, achieving success at places such as Island Number Ten, Memphis, and New Orleans. Learn about the fight for the Mississippi River in this lesson.

The Second Battle of Bull Run: Summary & Facts

10. The Second Battle of Bull Run: Summary & Facts

Second Battle of Bull Run was fought on August 28 and 29, 1862. It was a major Confederate victory that gave Robert E. Lee the momentum necessary to push north into Northern terrritory. There were over 22,000 combined casualties during the battle.

The Battle of Antietam: Conflict, Outcome & Significance

11. The Battle of Antietam: Conflict, Outcome & Significance

The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862. It was the bloodiest single day battle in American history, with over 23,000 casualties. The Union victory there led to the Emancipation Proclamation.

The Battle of Fredericksburg: Summary, Timeline & Significance

12. The Battle of Fredericksburg: Summary, Timeline & Significance

The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought December 13, 1862, was a major Confederate victory and one of the most lopsided defeats of the Civil War for Union forces. The battle had over 18,000 casualties.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

13. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

The Civil War West of the Mississippi River: Summary & Major Events

14. The Civil War West of the Mississippi River: Summary & Major Events

West of the Mississippi River, the Civil War was a struggle for territory and border states that lacked much of the bloodshed in the east, yet was still important to the war's outcome. This lesson will cover some of the key events of this theater of the war.

Britain and France Respond to the American Civil War

15. Britain and France Respond to the American Civil War

The American Civil War had international ramifications. Great Britain and France were two world powers who each had to decide on how they would react to the conflict.

General George McClellan: Civil War Facts & Timeline

16. General George McClellan: Civil War Facts & Timeline

George McClellan was a Union General in the American Civil War. He built the Army of the Potomac and led it during the Peninsula and Maryland Campaigns in 1862. Let's learn more about this complicated and fascinating Civil War general.

General George Meade: Civil War Facts & History

17. General George Meade: Civil War Facts & History

In this lesson, we'll be looking at General George Gordon Meade, who was an important Union general in the American Civil War. We'll look at his early life, his role in the Civil War, and other facts about the man's history. Then you can test your knowledge with a quiz!

General Winfield Scott and the Civil War

18. General Winfield Scott and the Civil War

General Winfield Scott was one of the most famous Americans of the 19th century. He led American forces to victory in the Mexican-American War and was Union General-in-Chief for the first few months of the Civil War.

The First Battle of Bull Run: Summary, Significance & Facts

19. The First Battle of Bull Run: Summary, Significance & Facts

The First Battle of Bull Run (also known as the First Manassas) was fought on July 21, 1861. It was the first major battle of the Civil War and resulted in a Confederate victory.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support