Copyright

Ch 2: Slavery in Early American History: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Slavery in Early American History chapter of this Civil War History Homework Help course helps students complete their slavery homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your slavery homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your slavery homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Henry Clay's role in the Missouri Compromise of 1820
  • The Mexican-American War
  • President Fillmore's support for the Compromise of 1850
  • The abolitionist movement
  • Bloody Kansas
  • Dred Scott v. Sanford
  • John Brown's raid at Harper's Ferry

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: Slavery in Early American History: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

1. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

2. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

3. President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

Following President Zachary Taylor's death, Millard Fillmore took office. He supported the Compromise of 1850 that added new states from the Mexican cession and attempted to resolve long-standing controversies over slavery.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

4. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

5. Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

The events in the Kansas territory were a microcosm of the violent forces shaping the United States in the decade of the 1850s, forces that would ultimately lead to a disintegration of the Union itself. This lesson details what has come to be known as Bleeding Kansas and its impact on the issue of slavery.

Dred Scott v. Sanford: Case Summary & Decision

6. Dred Scott v. Sanford: Case Summary & Decision

In this lesson, we will explore the famous Dred Scott v. Sanford Supreme Court case. We will learn about the case's background, the court's findings, and the impact of this landmark decision.

John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

7. John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

John Brown was a man of strong convictions - so strong that he was willing to fight, to kill, and to die for them. These abolitionist beliefs led him from Kansas to Virginia, where he would pay the ultimate price. This lesson tells that story.

Harriet Jacobs: Biography & Books

8. Harriet Jacobs: Biography & Books

In this lesson, you will learn about the life of Harriet Jacobs, an American abolitionist born into slavery. Explore how she fought slavery and read about her autobiography, which was published at the start of the Civil War.

The Slave Trade Compromise: Definition & Commerce

9. The Slave Trade Compromise: Definition & Commerce

Slavery has had dramatic impacts on American history. In this lesson, we'll look at one of the first attempts to resolve the debate on slavery through compromise.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support