Ch 26: Social Movements in the 19th & 20th Centuries

About This Chapter

Examine social movements of the 19th and 20th centuries with the lessons of this chapter. Take a look at reform movements, woman's suffrage, and the temperance movement.

Social Movements in the 19th & 20th Centuries - Chapter Summary

When you study these lessons you will be looking at leaders and causes of social movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. Follow the fight against alcohol and slavery, the right for public education for all, women's rights, and for humane asylums and prisons.

Analyze the struggle for temperance and how this movement influenced American politics in the 20th century. Get to know lesson information such as:

  • 19th century reform movements
  • Women's rights, roles, and limits as part of feminism in the 19th century
  • The accomplishments of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
  • Significance of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848
  • Causes, campaigns and impacts on the U.S. of the women's movement
  • Women's suffrage and early feminists
  • Beliefs of the temperance movement

Work on this study program whenever you have 15-20 minutes to complete a couple of lessons by logging in from your mobile device. You can track your progress on this course on your dashboard.

7 Lessons in Chapter 26: Social Movements in the 19th & 20th Centuries
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reform Movements of the 19th Century

1. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

2. Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

In this lesson, we explore the early women's rights movement and their rejection of traditional gender roles in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the United States and Great Britain.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women's Rights Facts & Accomplishments

3. Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women's Rights Facts & Accomplishments

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of most important women's rights activists of the 1800s. Read about her key contributions in the struggle for American women's right to vote, own property and have equality in marriage.

Seneca Falls Convention of 1848: Definition, Summary & Significance

4. Seneca Falls Convention of 1848: Definition, Summary & Significance

The American women's rights movement began with a meeting of reformers in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. Out of that first convention came a historic document, the 'Declaration of Sentiments,' which demanded equal social status and legal rights for women, including the right to vote.

The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

5. The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

The women's movement of the 1960s ushered in a new wave of feminism that sought to address the national issues of gender. Learn about the movement, its leaders and the ultimate outcome for women in the United States.

Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

6. Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

The women's suffrage movement became one of the most prominent areas of reform during the Progressive movement. Learn about the work of early feminists, changing roles of women and notable women suffrage leaders who pushed for women's right to vote.

The Temperance Movement: Definition, Leaders & Timeline

7. The Temperance Movement: Definition, Leaders & Timeline

Through this lesson, you will learn about the temperance movement, including what its members believed and how they influenced American politics in the 20th century.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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