Ch 5: Social Structure & Control

About This Chapter

If you need to study for an upcoming sociology exam, review this chapter on social control and structure. This study guide resource includes mobile-friendly lessons and interactive self-assessment quizzes to help you solidify your understanding of these topics.

Social Structure & Control - Chapter Summary

This chapter covers sociological concepts pertaining to social structure and control. You'll review several theories on control from important sociologists as well as various types of societies, social conformity and sanctions. Each lesson is taught by an expert instructor who breaks down essential definitions and theories in an engaging and easy-to-follow manner. You can submit questions to the instructors if you have any questions and take the accompanying lesson quizzes to make sure you fully comprehend the information. The lessons are available 24/7, and you can use your computer or mobile device to access the chapter materials.

This chapter's lessons are designed to help you:

  • Summarize Weber's theory of impersonal management, the classical theory of formal organization, Merton's strain theory and Sutherland's differential association theory
  • Define the concepts of gemeinschaft, gesellschaft and gentrification
  • Identify the six different types of societies that have existed throughout history
  • Compare and contrast informal and formal sanctions
  • Differentiate between normative and informational social conformity
  • Understand how social conflict theory and labeling theory relate to crime
  • Analyze white collar crime statistics

12 Lessons in Chapter 5: Social Structure & Control
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory of Impersonal Management

1. Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory of Impersonal Management

At a time when organizations were run like families, Max Weber looked for ways to bring a more formalized structure to organizations. Weber created the idea of bureaucratic management where organizations are more authoritative, rigid and structured. This lesson will describe the development of bureaucracy and common characteristics of bureaucratic organizations.

Classical Theory of Formal Organizations

2. Classical Theory of Formal Organizations

In this lesson, we'll go over some major theories of organizations that informed our earliest understandings of how organizations work. We'll talk about three major theories that helped define the study of organizations within sociology.

Historical Growth of Cities: Gemeinschaft, Gesellschaft, Gentrification & the Concentric Zone Model

3. Historical Growth of Cities: Gemeinschaft, Gesellschaft, Gentrification & the Concentric Zone Model

In this lesson, we will discuss the contributions to classifying social change of two social scientists: Ferdinand Tonnies and Ernest W. Burgess. We will study concepts that include gemeinschaft, gesellschaft and gentrification.

Types of Societies in Sociology

4. Types of Societies in Sociology

Did you know that there have been six types of societies throughout our history? Learn more about the different types of societies and the characteristics that are associated with each.

Social Control: Formal & Informal Sanctions

5. Social Control: Formal & Informal Sanctions

Social control is all about how we maintain order in society and avoid chaos. In this lesson, we'll talk about how we go about doing this through social sanctions including formal and informal ones.

Social Conformity Definition: Normative vs. Informational

6. Social Conformity Definition: Normative vs. Informational

Social conformity and obedience are two very powerful phenomenons in human behavior and sociology. In this lesson, we discuss the two types of social conformity and differentiate between conformity and obedience. We also discuss two famous experiments by Solomon Asch and Stanley Milgram.

Merton's Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

7. Merton's Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

Robert Merton (1910-2003) argued that society may be set up in a way that encourages too much deviance. Learn more about Robert Merton's strain theory and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

8. Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

Learn what constitutes differential association theory in this lesson. Examine the definition in detail, including the basic tenets of the theory. In addition, review several examples of the theory.

Social Conflict Theory and Crime: Definitions and Approach to Deviance

9. Social Conflict Theory and Crime: Definitions and Approach to Deviance

In this lesson, we discuss the social conflict approach to deviance, including the connection between deviance and power as well as deviance and capitalism. We also discuss the difference between white-collar and blue-collar crime and define corporate crime and organized crime.

Edwin Sutherland: Differential Association Theory

10. Edwin Sutherland: Differential Association Theory

Edwin Sutherland was an influential sociologist who made important contributions to the study of crime. In this lesson we'll talk about his approach to studying crime, including his theory of differential association.

What Is White Collar Crime? - Definition, Statistics & Examples

11. What Is White Collar Crime? - Definition, Statistics & Examples

White collar crimes involve criminal activities committed by people in the regular course of their business and involve bribery, extortion, fraud and embezzlement. These crimes usually end in financial gain for the perpetrator.

Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

12. Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

Labeling others is common in our society. In this lesson, we discuss the specifics of labeling theory, including when and why people are labeled. We also distinguish between retroactive and projective labeling and briefly discuss Travis Hirschi's control theory.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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