Ch 17: Social Studies Concepts: Civics

About This Chapter

Let us aid in your review of what defines culture and how perceptions differ among cultures. Learn more about real and ideal cultures and the meaning of visual representations of historical data.

Social Studies Concepts: Civics - Chapter Summary

In this chapter's lessons, you can refresh your understanding of what constitutes culture, and how perceptions of concepts such as time and emotions differ among cultures. Our instructors will explain theories regarding cultural analysis as well as cultural subsets. You'll also look at perceptions of culture and subsets in those cultures. After watching these videos and reading the texts, you should have a better understanding of topics including:

  • Material and nonmaterial culture
  • Elements of culture
  • Ideal and real culture, ethnocentrism and culture relativism
  • Theoretical approaches to cultural analysis
  • Emotional expression across cultures
  • Monochronic and polychromic time in organizations

These lessons average just five minutes in length, and you can watch them anytime you have an internet connection with a computer, smartphone or tablet. Our instructors make learning fun with plenty of examples, animations and humor. You can test your knowledge with short lesson quizzes and comprehensive chapter exams, and use video links to jump back to specific parts of the lessons you need to review.

7 Lessons in Chapter 17: Social Studies Concepts: Civics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Government? - Definition, Role & Functions

1. What is Government? - Definition, Role & Functions

In this lesson, we will examine the various definitions of government. Then we will take a close look at the functions of the U.S. government and the role it plays in citizens' everyday lives.

Traditional Types of Government: Definitions, Strengths & Weaknesses

2. Traditional Types of Government: Definitions, Strengths & Weaknesses

In this lesson, we will explore several traditional types of government. We will define each type and take a close look at its strengths and weaknesses.

What Is Civil Justice? - Definition, Process & Rules

3. What Is Civil Justice? - Definition, Process & Rules

In this lesson, you'll learn what constitutes civil justice by examining the definition of civil justice, reviewing the civil justice process, and analyzing the rules of civil justice.

Political Justice and Political Rights

4. Political Justice and Political Rights

Some of the greatest questions in political thought revolve around the nebulous concepts of justice and rights. In this lesson, we'll be exploring these complex concepts. You'll also have a chance to reinforce your knowledge with a short quiz.

America's Core Values: Liberty, Equality & Self-Government

5. America's Core Values: Liberty, Equality & Self-Government

In this lesson, we will examine a few of America's core values. We will focus especially on liberty, self-government, equality, individualism, diversity, and unity.

What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

6. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

Civil Society and Citizenship

7. Civil Society and Citizenship

Citizenship and civil society are important concepts in the study of political science. In this lesson, you'll learn what citizenship is and what it means for people that hold it. You'll also learn about the important role of civil society in a democracy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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