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Ch 31: Social Studies Research Skills

About This Chapter

Learn important topics and skills related to social studies research by watching this chapter's video lessons. Learn about the different types of research methodologies and see tips for identifying propaganda and informed opinion.

Social Studies Research Skills - Chapter Summary

These lessons are a great way to study some of the basic skills needed to perform social studies research effectively. You can see different types of data used in social studies and review ways to interpret it in your own research. You can also learn about major issues and topics that are often researched in social studies fields as well as the skills for compiling and analyzing relevant data. Topics you can go over in these lessons include:

  • Quantitative, qualitative and mixed research methodologies
  • Research data from archival and secondary sources
  • Inductive vs. deductive reasoning
  • Interpreting the contexts of written works
  • The definition, types, techniques and examples of propaganda
  • Persuasion, fact and informed opinion
  • Analyzing related texts
  • Interpreting visual representations of historical data

You can use the video tags included in each lesson to find the moments in the videos that correspond to the lesson's main points. The chapter also offers you transcripts of each video, should you like a hard copy of the lessons to study more in depth. Finally, be sure to answer the questions in the practice quizzes and final exam to see how much you can remember about some of the main points from the lessons.

9 Lessons in Chapter 31: Social Studies Research Skills
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Research Methodologies: Quantitative, Qualitative & Mixed Method

1. Research Methodologies: Quantitative, Qualitative & Mixed Method

While there are many ways to conduct an experiment in psychology, there are only so many ways you can describe it. In this lesson, we will discuss the differences, strengths, and weaknesses of the qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods.

Using Archival Research & Secondary Records to Collect Social Research Data

2. Using Archival Research & Secondary Records to Collect Social Research Data

This lesson explores the idea of what happens when researchers already have information and data that they can study. You'll get the chance to look at descriptions of archival and meta-analysis research.

Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

3. Inductive vs. Deductive Reasoning: Differences & Examples

This lesson explores the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning in the form of psychological experiments. In addition to defining these terms, the lesson gives examples to explain how this reasoning is applied.

Interpreting Works in Context

4. Interpreting Works in Context

In this lesson, we will learn how to interpret a written work in its context. We will explore the historical context, biographical context, context of language and form, and context of the reader.

Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

5. Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

Ever watched a football game with someone who was cheering for the other team and disagreed on the validity of a call? Then you've encountered the same problem historians find with diverse perspectives.

What is Propaganda? - Definition, Techniques, Types & Examples

6. What is Propaganda? - Definition, Techniques, Types & Examples

Through this lesson, you'll define propaganda and explore some examples. You'll also come to understand how propaganda is used in social and cultural arenas.

Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

7. Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

How do you know what to believe and what to doubt? Watch this video lesson to learn how to differentiate between facts, persuasion, and informed opinions.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

8. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

How to Interpret Visual Representations of Historical Data

9. How to Interpret Visual Representations of Historical Data

Think that historians only rely on dense textbooks full of nothing but words, dates, and more words? Think again. Historians actually use a variety of visual representations, ranging from images that they create to visuals that are sources themselves.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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