Ch 3: Sociological Theories of Delinquency

About This Chapter

If you're looking for a quick and efficient way to study sociological theories of delinquency, look no further than this online chapter. Available at any time, this series of lessons and quizzes can function as a convenient test prep resource, homework help tool and tutoring solution.

Sociological Theories of Delinquency - Chapter Summary

Work through this chapter at your own pace to review several sociological theories of delinquency. These bite-sized lessons are taught by expert instructors who clearly explain the features of sociological crime theories, as well as topics related to culture conflict, peacemaking, criminology theories and more. To help you solidify your understanding of these sociological theories, we've included lesson-specific quizzes and a comprehensive chapter exam. You can print lesson transcripts to supplement your studying experience, and our instructors are available to answer any questions you may have. These lessons and quizzes are accessible on any Internet-connected device, and once you've completed the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Recognize the features of sociological crime theories
  • Evaluate the Chicago School's social disorganization theory
  • Define the anomie theory, general strain theory and differential association theory
  • Understand the concepts of culture conflict and peacemaking
  • Explain several crime and criminology theories, including the social control theory, labeling theory, social learning theory

11 Lessons in Chapter 3: Sociological Theories of Delinquency
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sociological Theories of Crime: Overview & Features

1. Sociological Theories of Crime: Overview & Features

Why do crime rates vary from community to community? In this lesson, we'll take a look at sociological theories of criminology, including the social learning and social conflict theories and sociological programs to prevent crime.

The Chicago School's Social Disorganization Theory

2. The Chicago School's Social Disorganization Theory

Why do some neighborhoods have higher crime rates than others? What elements make a community vulnerable to crime? Watch this lesson to find out about the Chicago School of Criminology and the social disorganization theory of crime.

Anomie: Definition, Theory & Examples

3. Anomie: Definition, Theory & Examples

Learn what constitutes the concept of anomie. You will review anomie theory and examine several examples. Upon completion, you will have a thorough understanding of what constitutes anomie theory in criminal justice.

General Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

4. General Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

This lesson goes over something known as general strain theory. You'll learn its definition as well as how it applies to criminology with numerous examples.

What Is Culture Conflict? - Definition, Theory & Example

5. What Is Culture Conflict? - Definition, Theory & Example

Review the social structure theory known as culture conflict theory in this lesson. Learn the definition of the theory and go over the two major types of culture conflict. Then, examine several examples to gain a thorough understanding.

The Social Learning Theory of Crime

6. The Social Learning Theory of Crime

How much do your friends influence your behavior? In this lesson, we'll examine the social learning theory of criminology, including the ideas of differential association and differential reinforcement, and when the tenets of social learning theory are most likely to happen.

Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

7. Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

Learn what constitutes differential association theory in this lesson. Examine the definition in detail, including the basic tenets of the theory. In addition, review several examples of the theory.

Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

8. Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

Labeling others is common in our society. In this lesson, we discuss the specifics of labeling theory, including when and why people are labeled. We also distinguish between retroactive and projective labeling and briefly discuss Travis Hirschi's control theory.

The Social Control Theory of Criminology: Origins & Development

9. The Social Control Theory of Criminology: Origins & Development

When studying crime, many people ask questions about what causes criminals to commit crimes. But some people instead ask why people stay within the bounds of the law. In this lesson, we'll examine the social control theories of criminology.

The Critical Theories of Criminology: Overview & Features

10. The Critical Theories of Criminology: Overview & Features

This lesson explores critical theories of criminology (e.g., left realism, feminist theory, power-control theory). We'll also look at the justice system, crime, and delinquency, as they relate to each theory.

What is Peacemaking? - Definition & Theory

11. What is Peacemaking? - Definition & Theory

Peacemaking is a varied approach to resolving conflicts, ending injustice, and preventing violence. This lesson explores four theories of peacemaking to build a definition of peacemaking.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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