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Ch 3: Sociological Theories of Delinquency

About This Chapter

If you're looking for a quick and efficient way to study sociological theories of delinquency, look no further than this online chapter. Available at any time, this series of lessons and quizzes can function as a convenient test prep resource, homework help tool and tutoring solution.

Sociological Theories of Delinquency - Chapter Summary

Work through this chapter at your own pace to review several sociological theories of delinquency. These bite-sized lessons are taught by expert instructors who clearly explain the features of sociological crime theories, as well as topics related to culture conflict, peacemaking, criminology theories and more. To help you solidify your understanding of these sociological theories, we've included lesson-specific quizzes and a comprehensive chapter exam. You can print lesson transcripts to supplement your studying experience, and our instructors are available to answer any questions you may have. These lessons and quizzes are accessible on any Internet-connected device, and once you've completed the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Recognize the features of sociological crime theories
  • Evaluate the Chicago School's social disorganization theory
  • Define the anomie theory, general strain theory and differential association theory
  • Understand the concepts of culture conflict and peacemaking
  • Explain several crime and criminology theories, including the social control theory, labeling theory, social learning theory

11 Lessons in Chapter 3: Sociological Theories of Delinquency
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sociological Theories of Crime: Overview & Features

1. Sociological Theories of Crime: Overview & Features

Sociological theories of crime seek to explain observed criminal activity through the societal conditions in which they occur. Learn features of criminology and sociology, and where they are observed in public policy decisions.

The Chicago School's Social Disorganization Theory

2. The Chicago School's Social Disorganization Theory

According to the social disorganization theory of the Chicago School of Criminology, crime can result from unfavorable societal conditions. Review the definition of criminology, explore the Chicago School of Criminology, and examine the social disorganization theory.

Anomie: Definition, Theory & Examples

3. Anomie: Definition, Theory & Examples

The concept of anomie means the lack of normal ethical or social standards. Learn about French sociologist Emile Durkheim's theory on anomie and normlessness and explore real-life examples.

General Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

4. General Strain Theory: Definition & Examples

This lesson goes over something known as general strain theory. You'll learn its definition as well as how it applies to criminology with numerous examples.

What Is Culture Conflict? - Definition, Theory & Example

5. What Is Culture Conflict? - Definition, Theory & Example

According to culture conflict theory, crime can result from the clash of what different social groups consider acceptable behavior. Explore the definition and two types of culture conflict, and examine the examples.

The Social Learning Theory of Crime

6. The Social Learning Theory of Crime

The social learning theory of crime explains individuals' behavior by observing the surroundings that inform their actions and beliefs. Understand the concept of social learning and explore the types of reinforcement relating to criminal behavior.

Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

7. Differential Association Theory: Definition & Examples

Edwin H. Sutherland created a theory called Differential Association Theory in an attempt to try and explain why certain individuals become criminals. Take a closer look at this theory by studying its definition, Sutherland's nine basic tenants, and specific examples of Differential Association Theory.

Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

8. Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

Labeling theory argues that society assigns labels to certain groups and individuals that may influence their behavior. Learn about labeling theory and understand its impact on crime. Explore stigma, retrospective labeling, projective labeling, primary vs. secondary deviance, and Hirschi's control theory.

The Social Control Theory of Criminology: Origins & Development

9. The Social Control Theory of Criminology: Origins & Development

Social Control Theory of Criminology investigates people's reasoning for obedience, explained through social motivators. Learn the origins of internal and external pressures, containments, and how Walter Reckless developed these concepts.

The Critical Theories of Criminology: Overview & Features

10. The Critical Theories of Criminology: Overview & Features

This lesson explores critical theories of criminology (e.g., left realism, feminist theory, power-control theory). We'll also look at the justice system, crime, and delinquency, as they relate to each theory.

What is Peacemaking? - Definition & Theory

11. What is Peacemaking? - Definition & Theory

Peacemaking is a varied approach to resolving conflicts, ending injustice, and preventing violence. This lesson explores four theories of peacemaking to build a definition of peacemaking.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
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