Ch 5: STAAR English I: Drama

About This Chapter

Watch these lessons to help you prepare to answer any drama-related questions on the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) English I test. You may take the related chapter quiz at the end of your studies to determine how well you grasp the information.

STAAR English I: Drama - Chapter Summary

Our instructors created these short text and video lessons as preparation for you before taking the STAAR English I test. This chapter focuses on different aspects of drama, including relative terms, time periods, and styles, as well as how to read and interpret a play. They will also assist you in answering test questions about such topics as:

  • Acts, scenes, prologues, and epilogues used in drama structure
  • Characters, plot, setting, and symbolism elements of drama
  • Character dialogue and nonverbal communication
  • Dramatic monologue, soliloquy, and dramatic irony

Lessons are text or videos, with videos averaging 5-10 minutes in length. Each lesson includes a quiz at the end to test your understanding of the materials you just studied. If you need to study any of the material again, use the written transcripts or the timeline tool that allows you to replay any specific portion of the video.

8 Lessons in Chapter 5: STAAR English I: Drama
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

1. What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

Ever wonder why we use the word 'drama' when referencing people who overreact to a situation? Discover the definition of drama, its different styles, and why your friends might belong on the stage in this overview of the dramatic genre.

Drama Structure: Acts, Scenes, Prologue & Epilogue

2. Drama Structure: Acts, Scenes, Prologue & Epilogue

Plays have a definite structure that can include a prologue, acts, scenes, and an epilogue. In this lesson, you'll learn about each of those parts and how they fit together to form a play.

Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

3. Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

Have you ever wondered how actors in a play can convey a story without the audience reading the script? Watch and learn how playwrights use dramatic elements to tell a story on the stage.

Character Dialogue & Nonverbal Communication in a Drama

4. Character Dialogue & Nonverbal Communication in a Drama

Characters in plays have two ways of communicating with the audience and each other. They can use verbal or nonverbal forms of communication. In this lesson, you'll learn about how both are used in drama.

Reading & Interpreting Dialogue from a Script or Play

5. Reading & Interpreting Dialogue from a Script or Play

Interpreting lines from a play means more than understanding the definitions of the words. In this lesson, you'll learn how to tap into the emotional content of lines and develop an interpretation.

Dramatic Monologue: Definition & Examples

6. Dramatic Monologue: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will explore the dramatic monologue, a long piece of dialogue by one character that reveals the character's inner feelings, whether it be in a play, poem or novel.

Soliloquy: Definition & Examples

7. Soliloquy: Definition & Examples

Drama is a vastly different medium from written literature. This lesson focuses on one particular thing that exists only in spoken performances: the soliloquy.

Dramatic Irony: Definition & Examples

8. Dramatic Irony: Definition & Examples

Dramatic irony has the power to make us laugh, cry, or (sometimes) do both at the same time. In this lesson, we'll explore the comedic and tragic uses of dramatic irony, using examples from Shakespearean comedy and Ancient Greek tragedy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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