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Ch 10: STAAR Science - Grade 8: Living Organisms

About This Chapter

This chapter will provide students with a detailed overview of living organisms, so they can feel prepared for these types of questions on the STAAR Science - Grade 8 exam.

STAAR Science - Grade 8: Living Organisms - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter review important components and functions of living organisms. Students will refresh their understanding of cells and cell parts, reproduction, taxonomy and more. The lessons cover the following topics:

  • The classification of living things
  • Overview of cells and components of cell theory
  • Comparison of plant and animal cells
  • Properties of organelles
  • Similarities and differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells
  • Unicellular and multicellular organisms
  • Heterotrophs and autotrophs
  • Comparison of sexual and asexual reproduction
  • Major organ systems in the human body

Our instructors have developed these lessons so students are able to easily understand and retain the information being reviewed. To keep the learning experience inviting and efficient, video and text lessons are included to illustrate the material. Lesson quizzes are available for students to apply what they've learned. To practice for the STAAR Science - Grade 8 exam, students can take the cumulative chapter exam after reviewing the lessons.

12 Lessons in Chapter 10: STAAR Science - Grade 8: Living Organisms
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Taxonomy: Classification and Naming of Living Things

1. Taxonomy: Classification and Naming of Living Things

The name you give to a living thing may be completely different than the name someone else uses. In science, we use a common naming system for all living things to avoid confusion. This lesson will explore the basics of our classification system.

The Dichotomous Key: A Classifying Tool

2. The Dichotomous Key: A Classifying Tool

Sometimes, the best way to identify an object is to take a step-by-step approach. Dichotomous keys are perfect for this, helping us classify unknown objects through a series of questions and answers that lead us down the correct path.

What are Cells? - Overview

3. What are Cells? - Overview

All living organisms are made up of cells, but do you know what a cell is? In this lesson, you can learn about the three main structures that all cells contain and about the two major types of cells.

What is Cell Theory? - Definition, Timeline & Parts

4. What is Cell Theory? - Definition, Timeline & Parts

Many scientists and the discovery of the microscope contributed to new ideas about living things. One important idea is cell theory, which draws on the work of many scientists in the past to describe cells and how they are organized in living things.

The Difference Between Plant and Animal Cells

5. The Difference Between Plant and Animal Cells

While both plant and animal cells are eukaryotic and share many similarities, they also differ in several ways. Learn about the key differences between these two cell types in this lesson.

Organelles: Internal Components of a Cell

6. Organelles: Internal Components of a Cell

The organelles of a cell are much like the organs of your body. In fact, the word organelle means little organ. Learn about important organelles of a human cell, such as the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi bodies.

Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

7. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

In this lesson, we discuss the similarities and differences between the eukaryotic cells of your body and prokaryotic cells such as bacteria. Eukaryotes organize different functions within specialized membrane-bound compartments called organelles. These structures do not exist in prokaryotes.

Unicellular Organisms: Definition & Examples

8. Unicellular Organisms: Definition & Examples

Life takes a great variety of forms. This world is home to many simple organisms that live in a variety of environments. In this lesson, we will examine unicellular organisms to gain a better understanding of them.

Multicellular Organism: Examples & Definition

9. Multicellular Organism: Examples & Definition

Most organisms consist of only one cell and are invisible to the naked eye. Others, such as the rabbit, the bread mold and the pine tree, are made of many cells. Learn how to classify the multi-cellular organisms that inhabit our world.

Autotrophs and Heterotrophs

10. Autotrophs and Heterotrophs

Ever wonder where your energy comes from? What about a plant's energy? And where does it go? Learn about the flow of energy through the food chain in this lesson on autotrophs and heterotrophs.

Asexual vs. Sexual Reproduction: Comparison & Characteristics

11. Asexual vs. Sexual Reproduction: Comparison & Characteristics

Did you know that some organisms can reproduce without a mate? Check out this video lesson on asexual versus sexual reproduction to discover the different ways organisms can reproduce and the main differences between mitosis and meiosis.

What Are the Organ Systems of the Human Body?

12. What Are the Organ Systems of the Human Body?

In this lesson, you'll learn about the 11 organ systems, which are made of multiple organs that work together to keep the human body functioning. Using easy-to-understand descriptions and illustrations, we'll explore the circulatory, respiratory and digestive, systems, among other types, after which you'll have the chance to take a brief quiz and see how well you understood the material.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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