Ch 5: Stage 4 in Design Thinking: Prototype

About This Chapter

In this chapter, your employees will become knowledgeable of Stage 4 in design thinking, which is the Prototype stage. Employees can access this chapter whenever it's convenient. It contains short lessons that can help them quickly gain essential design-thinking skills.

Stage 4 in Design Thinking: Prototype - Chapter Summary

Have your employees work through this chapter to learn about the fourth stage of the design thinking process. After examining the purpose of the Prototype stage, your employees will take a look at relevant prototyping processes, applications, steps and best practices. When your employees complete the lessons, they'll be able to solidify their knowledge by taking the accompanying quizzes and chapter exam. The chapter is also available online 24/7, which helps employees study design thinking whenever they have free time.

How It Helps

  • Builds awareness: The chapter provides an overview of the entire Prototype stage in design thinking.
  • Compares prototyping approaches: Short lessons explain the differences between rapid prototyping, low-fidelity prototyping and high-fidelity prototyping.
  • Strengthens design-thinking skills: Employees who finish the chapter will be able to develop the types of prototyping skills that are needed for Stage 4 in design thinking.

Skills Covered

By the end of the chapter, your employees should be able to:

  • Describe the purpose and importance of the Prototype stage in design thinking
  • Explain the process of business model prototyping
  • Assess the relationship between rapid prototyping and concurrent design
  • Differentiate between low-fidelity and high-fidelity prototyping
  • Outline each step of the prototyping process
  • Create product prototype checklists
  • Transition from the Prototype stage to the Testing stage in the design-thinking process

7 Lessons in Chapter 5: Stage 4 in Design Thinking: Prototype
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Prototype Stage in Design Thinking: Purpose & Importance

1. The Prototype Stage in Design Thinking: Purpose & Importance

The Prototype stage in design thinking offers a quick and inexpensive way to get a model to consumers for testing. In this lesson, you'll learn more about this stage and the four purposes it serves.

Business Model Prototyping: Definition & Process

2. Business Model Prototyping: Definition & Process

Business model prototyping is a powerful tool to reduce the cost associated with a 'trial-and-error' approach to creating a thriving business. This lesson explores the process for creating and using a business model prototype.

Rapid Prototyping & Concurrent Design

3. Rapid Prototyping & Concurrent Design

With technology changing every day, the prototyping and design stages are getting shorter and shorter. Rapid prototyping and concurrent design help companies cope with the reduced time.

Low-Fidelity vs. High-Fidelity Prototyping

4. Low-Fidelity vs. High-Fidelity Prototyping

This lesson is going to differentiate between low-fidelity and high-fidelity prototypes. You'll also learn about their benefits, drawbacks, and examples of each.

Prototyping Process: Steps & Best Practices

5. Prototyping Process: Steps & Best Practices

The prototyping process turns ideas into actionable items that can later be tested. In this lesson, you'll learn more about the steps and best practices of creating models where end users can provide feedback.

Practical Application: Creating a Product Prototype Checklist

6. Practical Application: Creating a Product Prototype Checklist

This checklist is a planning guide for creating a product prototype that can help you make sure that you're covering all of the key details as you work. We'll also briefly explain the different types of prototypes and the materials needed for each one.

Transitioning from the Prototype Stage to the Testing Stage in Design Thinking

7. Transitioning from the Prototype Stage to the Testing Stage in Design Thinking

The Prototype and Testing stages of design thinking are linked by what the design team hopes to accomplish. In this lesson, you'll learn more about the movement from these last two stages of design thinking.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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