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Ch 4: Strategies for Analyzing Literature

About This Chapter

Learn about strategies for analyzing literature, which includes topics like analyzing, connecting, and comparing characters in a story. These brief lessons and quizzes can assist you with making sure you are prepared for an exam.

Strategies for Analyzing Literature - Chapter Summary

While studying these lessons, you will heighten your understanding of strategies for analyzing literature. Some of the topics covered include making text-to-text connections between written works and contrasting elements of a passage. This chapter can also help you understand how to analyze context, purpose, and audience texts. After reviewing the lessons, you should be ready to do the following:

  • List the steps involved in the analysis of literary passages
  • Explain the author's purpose
  • Discuss how characters, setting, and plot function together
  • Compare and contrast elements of a passage
  • Infer the feelings of a character
  • Analyze and suggest alternatives to a character's actions
  • Read a selection and make predictions
  • Connect different writings to each other

The lessons in this chapter are concise and can help you quickly get up to speed on strategies for analyzing literature. If you get stuck on a topic, you can submit questions to instructors by using the Help feature. Additionally, each lesson includes a full written transcript that you can print and use as a study tool.

14 Lessons in Chapter 4: Strategies for Analyzing Literature
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

2. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

Analyzing Theme Development in a Text: Characters, Setting & Plot

3. Analyzing Theme Development in a Text: Characters, Setting & Plot

Once you can identify the plot, setting, characters, and theme of a story, there's still more to consider. In this lesson, you'll get a sense of how all four of those terms function together to have an effect on the reader.

How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

4. How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

In this lesson, you'll learn how to compare and contrast when analyzing pieces of literature. You will also learn different strategies to assist in identifying key similarities and differences when applying compare and contrast.

Analyzing Context, Purpose & Audience in Texts

5. Analyzing Context, Purpose & Audience in Texts

Persuasive texts, whether written, oral, or visual, need to be aware of their context, purpose, and audience in order to truly be effective. Analyzing these three factors is the best way to evaluate a persuasive text and decide if it is 'good' or not.

How to Analyze Characters in Literature: Explanation and Examples

6. How to Analyze Characters in Literature: Explanation and Examples

In this lesson, we will learn to analyze characters in literature by comprehending, interpreting and drawing conclusions about each character. We will look at a story to practice analyzing characters.

Connecting Characters, Plot & Themes in a Text

7. Connecting Characters, Plot & Themes in a Text

Plot, theme, and characters are elements in almost every story, book, and play. In this lesson, you'll learn how they work together to create an impact on the reader, and you can test your understanding at the end with a short quiz.

Comparing & Contrasting Characters in a Story

8. Comparing & Contrasting Characters in a Story

Want to learn more about the importance of characters in a story? If so, then jump right into this lesson that describes how to compare and contrast characters in a piece of literature.

Inferring a Character's Feelings by Their Actions: Lesson for Kids

9. Inferring a Character's Feelings by Their Actions: Lesson for Kids

In this lesson, learn how to infer the feelings of a character based on the text from his or her actions or reactions. Determine how different actions of a character can change your interpretation of that character's feelings.

Suggesting Alternatives to a Character's Actions: Lesson for Kids

10. Suggesting Alternatives to a Character's Actions: Lesson for Kids

In this lesson, you will learn how to analyze the actions or choices of a character in a story. You will also learn how to suggest alternatives to a character's actions.

How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

11. How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

Making predictions when reading is an important reading comprehension strategy. In this lesson, we will discuss why it is important and how to model and practice it.

Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

12. Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

In this lesson, we will discuss connecting different writings to each other by learning about the authors, examining the literary elements, and reflecting on the writings.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

13. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

14. How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

In this lesson, we'll discuss how to analyze two texts that present opposing arguments. We'll examine arguments based on varying evidence and on varying assumptions.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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