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Ch 14: Strategies for Reading Expository Texts

About This Chapter

View the lessons in this chapter on expository texts to improve your understanding of how these texts are organized, use of supporting details and evidence, and ways to analyze graphic information in a text.

Strategies for Reading Expository Texts - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you can follow along with our expert instructors as they discuss strategies for reading expository texts. Lessons cover the organizational features of expository texts; how to analyze graphic information inside a text; and tips for understanding the main idea, purpose and audience of expository texts. Completing this chapter will also prepare you to:

  • Give an objective summary of an informational text
  • Provide examples of implied main idea
  • Explain how to illustrate the main point with supporting details
  • Draw inferences from informational text
  • Analyze two texts related by theme or topic

Lessons are mobile-device compatible so you don't have to limit your studies to your time sitting in front of a computer. Text transcripts can be used to reinforce your retention of the information presented in the videos. Take the quizzes to gauge and reinforce your knowledge.

8 Lessons in Chapter 14: Strategies for Reading Expository Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Informational Texts: Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

1. Informational Texts: Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

This lesson describes what is and is not informational text. You'll discover the purpose, features, and audience of informational text. You'll also explore examples of informational text.

Organizational Features of Expository Texts

2. Organizational Features of Expository Texts

Reading an expository text can seem like an intimidating ordeal. Read this lesson to find out how to use specific features of expository text to help you understand the material.

Objective Summary of Informational Text: Definition & Example

3. Objective Summary of Informational Text: Definition & Example

One of the most popular assignments in an English class directs you to write a summary. You read a text, now what was it about? In this lesson, we will discover strategies for how to write an objective summary of an informational text.

Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

4. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

5. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

6. Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

As it turns out, you may be learning more from a text than you realize. That's because in every text, some information is inferred. In this lesson, we're going to see how drawing inferences from an informational text can help us better understand it.

How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

7. How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

In this lesson, we explore graphic information in texts. We will take a look at the types of graphics often seen in nonfiction, learn how to analyze them, and see how they contribute to the texts' information.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

8. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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