Ch 11: Studying Social Institutions

About This Chapter

Improve your understanding of social institutions, such as family and kinship, schooling, and health care. Other topics include religiosity, secularization, and civil religion. These brief lessons are helpful to students preparing for a test or completing a homework assignment.

Studying Social Institutions - Chapter Summary

In this chapter on social institutions, you'll find discussions that help you understand key concepts of religion, the meaning of non-traditional family, and socialized medicine. You'll also find information on religion encompassing Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. After completing the chapter, you should be able to do the following:

  • Define patrilocality, matrilocality, and neolocality
  • Discuss family life stages and traditions
  • Assess religious views like atheism, agnosticism, and theism
  • Explain monotheism and nontheism
  • Explore religion and social change in protestantism and literation theology
  • Examine the functions of school and school controversies
  • Demonstrate understanding of the economics of health and health challenges in America
  • Detail the different types of health care and the social constructions of health

Our subject matter experts present a broad range of information on social institutions in these short video lessons. Their teaching strategy includes plenty of examples to ensure the material is easily understood. The video timelines let you navigate the videos and review topics in order of your preference. A brief multiple-choice quiz is available for each lesson to test your knowledge.

16 Lessons in Chapter 11: Studying Social Institutions
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Family and Kinship: Patrilocality, Matrilocality & Neolocality

1. Family and Kinship: Patrilocality, Matrilocality & Neolocality

The family, as a social institution, is an extremely important subject of study for sociologists. In this lesson, we define family and kinship, and we discuss three different patterns of residency and systems of family lineage.

Family Life Stages and Traditions: Courtship, Marriage, Child Rearing & Aging

2. Family Life Stages and Traditions: Courtship, Marriage, Child Rearing & Aging

In this lesson, we discuss the four stages of traditional family life that sociologists study. Although the concept of family has changed with time, these four stages remain prominent in our culture.

What Is a Non-Traditional Family? - Definition of Options

3. What Is a Non-Traditional Family? - Definition of Options

Although traditional families once dominated many neighborhoods, today, there are lots of ways to form a family beyond the traditional idea of a married mother and father raising children.

Religious Views: Atheism, Agnosticism & Theism

4. Religious Views: Atheism, Agnosticism & Theism

Sociology of religion is a large branch of sociology. The different views on deities are studied as part of this topic. In this lesson, we compare and contrast the views of theism, atheism, and agnosticism.

Religion: Key Concepts and Definitions

5. Religion: Key Concepts and Definitions

Sociologists strive to study every aspect of religion in an objective way. In this lesson, we define religion and identify key concepts that are found in religion. We also discuss the difference between churches, sects, and cults.

Monotheism: Islam, Judaism & Christianity

6. Monotheism: Islam, Judaism & Christianity

In this lesson, we define monotheism and identify three significant monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We also discuss the ideology of each of these three religions.

Nontheism: Hinduism, Buddhism & Confucianism

7. Nontheism: Hinduism, Buddhism & Confucianism

Not all religions focus on the belief (or disbelief) in a particular deity. In this lesson, we define nontheism and discuss the ideologies of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism.

Religion and Social Change in Protestantism and Liberation Theology

8. Religion and Social Change in Protestantism and Liberation Theology

Religion can, at times, be a powerful agent for social change. In this lesson, we discuss two examples of the dichotomy between religion and the secular world, including Max Weber's book, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, as well as the concept of liberation theology.

Religiosity, Secularization & Civil Religion: Applications on Individuals & Cultures

9. Religiosity, Secularization & Civil Religion: Applications on Individuals & Cultures

In this lesson, we define religiosity, secularization, and civil religion. We'll also discuss these concepts both on an individual and cultural scale.

Schooling: Cultural Differences in Schooling Theory

10. Schooling: Cultural Differences in Schooling Theory

The value of education and access to it is different across cultures. In this lesson, we discuss some of the differences in schooling between lower-income and higher-income nations. We also discuss the education system and cultural values of several countries.

Functions of School: Socialization, Cultural Innovation, Integration & Latent Functions

11. Functions of School: Socialization, Cultural Innovation, Integration & Latent Functions

Schools serve a number of functions in our society beyond just transmitting academic knowledge and skills. In this lesson, we differentiate between manifest and latent functions of schools and discuss examples of each.

School Controversies: Self-Fulfilling Prophecies and Tracking

12. School Controversies: Self-Fulfilling Prophecies and Tracking

In this lesson, we define self-fulfilling prophecies and tracking, two controversial elements of education today. We will also discuss the educational advantages and disadvantages of each element.

Economics and Health: Healthcare, Medical Issues & Income

13. Economics and Health: Healthcare, Medical Issues & Income

What is the relationship between economy and health? In this lesson, we discuss differences in healthcare and medical issues in low-income versus high-income countries. We also define social epidemiology and discuss the link between poverty and poor health.

Health Challenges in America: Smoking, Obesity, STDs & Eating Disorders

14. Health Challenges in America: Smoking, Obesity, STDs & Eating Disorders

Even as a high-income nation with a relatively long life expectancy, America faces a number of health challenges. In this lesson, we discuss the basic facts of smoking, eating disorders, obesity and STDs and how these challenges affect our nation.

Types of Health Care: HMOs, PPOs, Socialized Medicine & Direct-Fee System

15. Types of Health Care: HMOs, PPOs, Socialized Medicine & Direct-Fee System

In this lesson, we discuss health care as a social institution and how health care systems differ worldwide. We also discuss several different ways that health care is paid for by patients, organizations and government.

Social Constructions of Health: Sick Role, Physician's Role & Profit Motive in Medicine

16. Social Constructions of Health: Sick Role, Physician's Role & Profit Motive in Medicine

In this lesson, we discuss the theory of Talcott Parsons regarding the 'sick role' and the 'physician's role' as well as how society has constructed expectations for both. We also discuss the profit motive in medicine and why this is controversial.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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