Ch 6: Substantive & Procedural Law

About This Chapter

If you're looking for a quick way to review substantive and procedural law, look no further than these engaging criminal law lessons. This mobile-friendly chapter can help you study for test, get extra homework help, supplement your textbooks and much more.

Substantive & Procedural Law - Chapter Summary

Take a look at this chapter's lessons to study the fundamentals of substantive and procedural law. You'll learn about the differences between these two types of law, as well as see concepts related to the exclusionary rule, warrants, due process, Miranda warnings and interrogations. Our expert instructors have designed these lessons to be short, entertaining and simple. Take the accompanying self-assessment quizzes to reinforce your understanding of the material, and study whenever you have free time in your schedule. By the end of the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Differentiate between substantive law and procedural law
  • Trace the development of substantive criminal law
  • Summarize the Bill of Rights
  • Evaluate the concept of due process in terms of crime control
  • Define criminal procedure rules and laws
  • Evaluate legal restraints regarding police actions
  • Understand concepts about Miranda warnings, interrogations and police intelligence
  • Explain laws and rights pertaining to search and seizure
  • Recognize examples of warrants
  • Identify Supreme Court decisions about constitutional criminal procedure
  • Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the Patriot Act and the exclusionary rule

12 Lessons in Chapter 6: Substantive & Procedural Law
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

1. Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

Substantive law and procedural law work together to ensure that in a criminal or civil case, the appropriate laws are applied and the proper procedures are followed to bring a case to trial. In this lesson, we'll discuss the differences between the two and how they relate to the legal system as a whole.

Substantive Criminal Law: Definition & Development

2. Substantive Criminal Law: Definition & Development

Substantive criminal law is interpreted through a body of rules that dictate what a crime is and how punishment for a crime is administered. Learn more about it in this lesson.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

3. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

What Is Due Process in Crime Control? - Definition & Guarantees

4. What Is Due Process in Crime Control? - Definition & Guarantees

Due process refers to the means, guaranteed by the Constitution, for insuring that the government provides justice to its citizens in all legal proceedings. Learn more about due process in crime control and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Criminal Procedure Rules: Definition, Laws & Examples

5. Criminal Procedure Rules: Definition, Laws & Examples

In this lesson, you will be introduced to rules of criminal procedure. This lesson also covers the administration of criminal justice and provides examples of the application of the laws of criminal procedure.

Legal Restraints on Police Actions

6. Legal Restraints on Police Actions

Legal restraints on police actions are designed to protect individuals from abuses of police power. This lesson explains how legal restraints on police actions originate from the U.S. Constitution, and discusses abuse of police power.

Police Intelligence, Interrogations & Miranda Warnings

7. Police Intelligence, Interrogations & Miranda Warnings

Police departments must receive and disseminate critical information. This is known as the police intelligence function. This lesson explains the intelligence function, including police interrogations and the role of Miranda warnings.

Search & Seizure: Definition, Laws & Rights

8. Search & Seizure: Definition, Laws & Rights

In this lesson, we will discuss the legal definition of search and seizure. The laws that pertain to search and seizure and an individual's rights will also be explored in this lesson.

The Exclusionary Rule: Definition, History, Pros & Cons

9. The Exclusionary Rule: Definition, History, Pros & Cons

The exclusionary rule is one of the most commonly-used (and famous) principles in U.S. criminal law. If evidence is illegally or unconstitutionally seized, it can't be used at trial - and this rule has changed the most basic ways in which the criminal justice system operates.

What Is a Warrant? - Definition & Examples

10. What Is a Warrant? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will teach you about warrants. Initially, we'll learn what constitutes a warrant and learn what an arrest warrant and a search warrant are, including their basic differences. Then we'll review some examples of each one.

Supreme Court Decisions on Constitutional Criminal Procedure

11. Supreme Court Decisions on Constitutional Criminal Procedure

This lesson discusses the important Supreme Court decisions that established the rights a person has while in the criminal justice system. A short quiz follows the lesson to check for your understanding.

What Is the Patriot Act? - Definition, Summary, Pros & Cons

12. What Is the Patriot Act? - Definition, Summary, Pros & Cons

Learn about the U.S. Patriot Act in this lesson. Review a summary of the Patriot Act and the key components of the law. Examine the pros and cons of the act to gain a thorough understanding of the law.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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