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Ch 15: Supreme Court Cases 1970-1971

About This Chapter

This chapter discusses important Supreme Court cases from 1970 to 1971. These expertly taught lessons and mini quizzes can be used for test preparation, homework help, tutoring, textbook supplementation or independent learning.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning about Supreme Court cases from 1970-1971 will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to study important case briefs, rulings, arguments and opinions regarding these cases. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing Supreme Court cases
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning about U.S. Supreme Court cases (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Complete each lesson in the chapter to review all key topics.
  • Refer to the lesson to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with the Supreme Court Cases 1970-1971 chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  •  Study Efficiently: The lessons in this chapter cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging instruction and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take the Supreme Court Cases 1970-1971 chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any Supreme Court question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: View lessons on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about Supreme Court cases from 1970-1971 for a standard U.S. government course. Cases covered include:

  • Goldberg v. Kelly
  • In re Winship
  • Ashe v. Swenson
  • Waller v. Florida
  • North Carolina v. Alford
  • Oregon v. Mitchell
  • Younger v. Harris
  • Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe
  • Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
  • Richardson v. Perales
  • Cohen v. California
  • Bivens v. Six Unknown Named Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics
  • Clay v. United States
  • New York Times v. United States
  • Reed v. Reed

10 Lessons in Chapter 15: Supreme Court Cases 1970-1971
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Goldberg v. Kelly Case Brief: Summary, Arguments & Decision

1. Goldberg v. Kelly Case Brief: Summary, Arguments & Decision

Welfare benefits are given to people who are in need of assistance. In this case, we will look at the Supreme Court's ruling's impact the process of revoking a person's benefits.

In re Winship Case Brief: Summary, Ruling & Significance

2. In re Winship Case Brief: Summary, Ruling & Significance

For a defendant to be convicted of a crime, the jury must find guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. In this lesson, we will learn if the Supreme Court in ''In re Winship'' applied the same standard in juvenile cases.

Collateral Estoppel Examples: Ashe v. Swenson & Waller v. Florida

3. Collateral Estoppel Examples: Ashe v. Swenson & Waller v. Florida

Collateral estoppel prevents courts from relitigating the same issue over and over. In this lesson, we will learn the definition of collateral estoppel and look at some examples of how it works.

North Carolina v. Alford (1970): Case Brief, Summary & Facts

4. North Carolina v. Alford (1970): Case Brief, Summary & Facts

Defendants often plead guilty to avoid a trial and a possible harsher sentence. In this lesson we will learn if a guilty plea can be accepted if the defendant insists that he or she is innocent.

Oregon v. Mitchell Case Brief (1970): Summary, Facts & Dissenting Opinion

5. Oregon v. Mitchell Case Brief (1970): Summary, Facts & Dissenting Opinion

The Constitution gives the federal government some authority over elections. In this lesson, we will learn if that power extends to set the ages of voters in both federal and state elections.

Younger v. Harris (1971) Case Brief

6. Younger v. Harris (1971) Case Brief

The Constitution creates a separation between federal and state governments. In ''Younger v. Harris'', the Supreme Court was called on to see how this doctrine affected the prosecution of a state citizen by the state.

Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education: Case Brief, Summary & Impact

7. Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education: Case Brief, Summary & Impact

What does it mean to be desegregated? Does a school have an obligation to actively make sure that its schools are diverse? These are the questions asked in the landmark case ''Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg,'' explored in this lesson.

Bivens v. Six Unknown Named Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics Case Brief

8. Bivens v. Six Unknown Named Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics Case Brief

This lesson briefly describes the Fourth Amendment and summarizes a Supreme Court case that says private citizens have the right to sue federal agents in federal court for alleged violations of the Fourth Amendment.

New York Times v. United States (1971): Summary, Case Brief & Impact

9. New York Times v. United States (1971): Summary, Case Brief & Impact

In this lesson we will learn about the 1971 Supreme Court case titled New York Times v. United States and its impact on both United States history and First Amendment law.

Reed v. Reed (1971) Case Brief: Summary, Decision & Significance

10. Reed v. Reed (1971) Case Brief: Summary, Decision & Significance

The 1970s were a decade marked by significant social change. The case of Reed vs. Reed supported this change in terms of women's rights. This lesson will provide a case summary, discuss the decision, and explain the significance.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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