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Ch 16: TASC Science: Earth's Formation & Plate Tectonics

About This Chapter

Get ready for the TASC Science test by watching our informative videos on Earth's formation. The lessons in this chapter review topics in plate tectonics, continental drift and sea floor spreading.

TASC Science: Earth's Formation & Plate Tectonics - Chapter Summary

Watch the fun videos in this chapter to prepare for questions on the TASC Science exam that relate to the formation of the Earth. The lessons provide an overview of the evidence and theories that relate to:

  • Earth's formation
  • Continental drift
  • Plate tectonics
  • Plate movement and boundaries
  • Continental margins
  • Oceanic ridge system
  • Ocean drilling
  • Paleomagnetism
  • Sea floor spreading

This chapter includes brief video lessons that are taught by experienced instructors and include fun graphics and examples. Additional resources include transcripts that highlight key terms, multiple-choice quizzes and an end-of-chapter exam.

TASC Science: Earth's Formation & Plate Tectonics Objectives

Similar to the GED, the TASC is a high school equivalency exam that assesses your knowledge in five main content areas: social studies, reading, writing, math and science. The science exam includes 58 questions, most of which are multiple-choice, pulled from three main content areas: Earth and space science, physical science and life science. The topics in this chapter may be found within the Earth and space science questions, which make up 28% of the test questions.

You'll have 85-90 minutes to complete this test, and test questions typically ask you to comprehend and analyze information from text passages, maps, graphs or charts; evaluate the accuracy of scientific methods; and apply those methods to a scientific situation.

12 Lessons in Chapter 16: TASC Science: Earth's Formation & Plate Tectonics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Formation of the Earth: Theories

1. Formation of the Earth: Theories

In this lesson, the theory of how the planet Earth formed will be discussed. This includes looking at how it differentiated into three layers, how it formed its atmosphere, water, and land features, and how it continues to evolve today.

Geological Evidence of Earth's Formation

2. Geological Evidence of Earth's Formation

How did the Earth form? When did it form? And more importantly, how do we know? Learn about the evidence we have for the formation of the Earth. See how many clues you picked up by taking a quiz.

Alfred Wegener's Theory of Continental Drift

3. Alfred Wegener's Theory of Continental Drift

People used to think that Earth was static, and that it never changed. Gradually, a body of evidence was gathered that made no sense in this model. Alfred Wegener, Geologic Supersleuth, laid the groundwork for a whole new theory for the large-scale changing nature of the earth.

Evidence for the Mechanism of Continental Drift

4. Evidence for the Mechanism of Continental Drift

As scientists began to explore the ocean floor after World War II, they discovered many new clues to help them solve a mystery that had begun decades earlier - how the continents moved about on the surface of the earth.

Plate Tectonics: A Unified Theory for Change of the Earth's Surface

5. Plate Tectonics: A Unified Theory for Change of the Earth's Surface

After many years of trying to solve the mystery of the moving continents, enough data and evidence was collected to develop a unifying theory of how the surface of the earth changes. It's called plate tectonics.

Causes of Tectonic Plate Movement

6. Causes of Tectonic Plate Movement

In this lesson, we explore the causes of plate movement, including thermal convection, ridge push and slab pull. Students will learn how these processes complement each other and form a theory for tectonic plate movement.

Plate Boundaries: Convergent, Divergent, and Transform Boundaries

7. Plate Boundaries: Convergent, Divergent, and Transform Boundaries

In the theory of plate tectonics, the earth's crust is broken into plates that move around relative to each other. As a result of this movement, three types of plate boundaries are formed: divergent, convergent, and transform boundaries.

Active & Passive Continental Margins

8. Active & Passive Continental Margins

Continental margins are areas that separate the continental crust and oceanic crust. Discover the differences between the tectonically active continental margins and the relatively quiet passive continental margins.

Oceanic Ridge System: Formation & Distribution

9. Oceanic Ridge System: Formation & Distribution

The oceanic ridge system is a continuous underwater mountain range with parts found in every ocean of the world. The ridge system is created when magma rising between diverging plates of the lithosphere cools and forms a new layer of crust.

Ocean Drilling as Evidence for Plate Tectonics

10. Ocean Drilling as Evidence for Plate Tectonics

The Deep Sea Drilling Project extracted samples of the ocean floor that provided evidence to support the hypothesis of seafloor spreading and the theory of plate tectonics. Learn how these samples provided proof.

Paleomagnetism and Hot Spots: Evidence for Plate Tectonics

11. Paleomagnetism and Hot Spots: Evidence for Plate Tectonics

Paleomagnetism is the study of past magnetic fields. Hot spots are fixed pockets of heat that well up to form volcanic features. Learn how paleomagnetism and the study of hot spots provide evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics.

Sea Floor Spreading and Polar Reversal

12. Sea Floor Spreading and Polar Reversal

Sea floor spreading is the process by which new oceanic crust is formed by the upwelling of magma through diverging tectonic plates. Learn about the relationship between sea floor spreading and polar reversals detected on the ocean floor.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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