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Ch 35: Teaching Social Science, History & Culture

About This Chapter

This course discusses basic teaching resources, primary and secondary historical sources, and focuses on the importance of the learning environment in the classroom. It teaches about family, cultures and traditions, defines social institutions, and provides examples.

ABOUT THIS CHAPTER

1. About Social Institutions: Definitions and Examples. Chapter Summary

Social institutions can be defined as the normal accepted behavior patterns in a particular human society that organize family and social life. Marriage, divorce, the care and education of children, the acquisition and defense of property are first and foremost social institutions. In many cultures social institutions derive from and reflect widespread religious beliefs and are supported by political institutions.

2. Examples of Social Institutions from History:

As an example, marriage, which today is a joining of persons on the basis of compatibility and love, derives from an institution designed to protect property values. In seventeenth century America, brides were joined to grooms in order to adjoin parcels of property. Marriage decisions were made by parents who were the property owners. The bride and groom had no choice in the matter, and often didn't know each other. In families where property wasn't at issue and people joined together on the basis of personal affinity, there often were no marriages at all.

Social institutions are always made clearer when they are challenged. For example, in seventeenth century Virginia, a marriage ceremony took place between James Blair, the Commissary of the Church of England, to Sarah Harrison, daughter of Benjamin Harrison II, a wealth tobacco planter. Sarah before numerous guests at her wedding stated out loud, 'No Obey!' when asked if she would love, honor and obey her husband. [1]

Virginia history showed the influence of powerful property owning women who shaped the social institutions to come. In Virginia, property arrangements like pre-nuptial agreements, enforced by courts, can be traced back to the 1657 marriage contract of Hannah Bennett Turner Tompkins Arnold to her third husband stipulating which property would be inherited by each of her children by her prior marriages. [2]

[#1] B. McLennan, 'The Wealth of Jamestown,'2017, quoting from original documents held in the archives of the William and Mary library).

[#2] See McLennan above. The original marriage document can be found in the archives of the York County Court House, Virginia.

3. Topics from the Chapter:

• Definition of social institutions

• Historical basis for social institutions

• How social institutions change reflecting human behavior

4. Overview:

Students will be informed about the instructors and their background. Students will receive lesson transcripts and be shown some short relevant videos. Through the course students will have access to self- assessment quizzes.

11 Lessons in Chapter 35: Teaching Social Science, History & Culture
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Teaching Resources & Curriculum Materials in Instructional Design

1. Teaching Resources & Curriculum Materials in Instructional Design

Successful teachers design rich learning opportunities for students. This lesson identifies and discusses the use of teaching resources and curriculum materials to design learning experiences.

Supporting Comprehension of Informational Texts

2. Supporting Comprehension of Informational Texts

Reading and comprehending informational texts is an important skill for students. This lesson will detail several strategies you can use to support student comprehension of these texts.

Social Studies Instruction: Selecting Resources & Assessments

3. Social Studies Instruction: Selecting Resources & Assessments

In this lesson, we will learn how to supplement the social studies textbook with other materials, such as technology resources, books, videos, and other sources that give students a well-rounded perspective.

Learning Environment in the Classroom: Definition, Impact & Importance

4. Learning Environment in the Classroom: Definition, Impact & Importance

One of the most important things a teacher can do is provide a positive learning experience. Setting up a positive learning environment is tricky, but not difficult. Get ready to learn about how to do this and why.

Literacy Strategies for Social Studies

5. Literacy Strategies for Social Studies

Students may find reading about social studies topics challenging. In this lesson, we will learn about literacy strategies designed to help students with comprehension and independent thinking. Take a quiz after the lesson to test your knowledge.

Teaching About Family, Cultures & Traditions

6. Teaching About Family, Cultures & Traditions

In this lesson, we will learn how to provide instruction related to family, culture, and tradition by presenting content from a multicultural approach. We will identify ways to promote diversity while addressing these themes.

Social Institutions: Definition & Examples

7. Social Institutions: Definition & Examples

Explore the inner workings of how societies establish subsystems that facilitate their survival. Learn about how each of these institutions contributes to the overall functioning of a society.

Teaching Students to Think Like Historians

8. Teaching Students to Think Like Historians

In this lesson, we discover some of the teaching techniques and exercises you can use to get your students to begin thinking, researching, and writing like historians.

Understanding History Through Cause-and-Effect Relationships

9. Understanding History Through Cause-and-Effect Relationships

Did you know that the seeds of the destruction of the Ming Dynasty were planted in 1492? Or an accidental suntan launched a multi-billion dollar industry? Cause and effect relationships are at the core of understanding history.

Historical Timelines: Strategies for Interpretation

10. Historical Timelines: Strategies for Interpretation

In this lesson we will learn about strategies for interpreting historical timelines. We will also learn how to find connections between world, American, and local historical events.

Primary vs. Secondary Resources in Historical Research

11. Primary vs. Secondary Resources in Historical Research

Good history and good cooking can both be ruined by not using the proper ingredients. This lesson explains why that is true while describing the roles of primary and secondary sources.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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