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Ch 4: The American Revolution (1775-1783): Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The American Revolution (1775-1783) chapter of this AP US History Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the American Revolution. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the events and impacts of the American Revolution required in a typical AP US history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other AP US history work.
  • Identify the American Revolution concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our AP US history tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the American Revolution and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the outbreak of war at Lexington and Concord, Declaration of Independence, leadership of George Washington, naval battles, Southern loyalists, Treaty of Paris or any other American Revolution topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their American Revolution unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in AP US history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the American Revolution simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live AP US history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the American Revolution on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the beginnings of the American Revolution.
  • Explain the impact of the Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense on the colonists' goal for independence.
  • Examine the Declaration of Independence and its legacy.
  • Compare and contrast the views of the British loyalists and American patriots.
  • Discuss George Washington's leadership during the war.
  • Take a look at the major naval battles of the Revolutionary War.
  • Learn about Britain's final efforts to win the war.
  • Discuss the Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris.
  • Describe the social and economic impacts of the American Revolution.
  • Learn about the Second Great Awakening following the Revolution.

20 Lessons in Chapter 4: The American Revolution (1775-1783): Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

1. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

2. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

3. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

4. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

5. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

6. John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

Naval battles in the American Revolution are something of a lost chapter in history. Find out about the world's first military submarine, the privateers of the Continental Navy, and the helpful actions of three foreign allies at sea.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

7. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

After surrendering their northern army in the American Revolution, British leaders looked to the Southern Strategy. General Charles Cornwallis hoped that loyalist forces would hold territory so he could sweep north and end the war in Virginia.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

8. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

9. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

10. The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

The spirit of the Revolution led to changes in American churches in the post-war years. Beginning with a boom in evangelism and missionary work, the Second Great Awakening soon led to social reform, an intertwining of religious values with civic values, and a lasting emphasis on morality in daily life.

Declaration of Independence: Signers & History

11. Declaration of Independence: Signers & History

The Declaration of Independence is the document on which the principles of American politics are based. In this lesson, we'll discuss the men who signed the Declaration of Independence and the history behind this historical document.

Patrick Henry: Quotes & Overview

12. Patrick Henry: Quotes & Overview

Patrick Henry was a leader in the American Revolution who served as a governor of Virginia and a member of the Virginia House of Burgess and the Virginia House of Delegates. He was a strong advocate for independence and denounced British policy for many years.

Paul Revere: Biography, Facts & Quotes

13. Paul Revere: Biography, Facts & Quotes

Paul Revere and his famous ride to Lexington played a pivotal role in the American Revolution. Read this lesson to learn about the life of this famous patriot!

The Intolerable Acts of 1774: Definition, Summary & Significance

14. The Intolerable Acts of 1774: Definition, Summary & Significance

The relationship between Great Britain and the American colonies, already deteriorating after 1763, plunged in 1773 with the Boston Tea Party. In this lesson, learn about the British reaction to this event, and how it caused a big step toward war and revolution.

The Quartering Act of 1765: Definition, Summary & Facts

15. The Quartering Act of 1765: Definition, Summary & Facts

The American Revolution wasn't just about 'life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness' - it was also about rights that were more grounded in real life. The Quartering Act of 1765 was seen by many Americans as a violation of those rights and was a contributing factor in the Revolution.

The Quebec Act: Definition & Summary

16. The Quebec Act: Definition & Summary

The Quebec Act of 1774 was meant to improve Britain's governance of Quebec, Canada. The act was meant to be an act of good faith towards the Canadians, but it had limited success and ultimately hastened the American Revolution.

The Tea Act of 1773: Definition, Summary & Facts

17. The Tea Act of 1773: Definition, Summary & Facts

How did the American colonies and the British government come to the brink of war and revolution in 1773? Mostly because of tea. The British plan to tax the colonies, and their resistance, can be summed up in the description of one very badly-timed law: the Tea Act of 1773.

The Townshend Acts: Definition, Summary & Facts

18. The Townshend Acts: Definition, Summary & Facts

The American argument against British taxation before the Revolutionary War--that it was unfair without representation in Parliament--was seemingly dealt with by a series of fees called the Townshend Acts. What resulted, however, was an increase in violence and a longer step towards independence by frustrated Americans.

Who Was Benedict Arnold? - Biography, Facts, & Timeline

19. Who Was Benedict Arnold? - Biography, Facts, & Timeline

Today, his name is synonymous with 'traitor,' but his reasons for defecting to the British are more complex. This lesson will explore the life of Benedict Arnold, with emphasis on his role in the Revolutionary War and his reasons for turning to the enemy.

Francis Marion & the Revolutionary War: Facts & Biography

20. Francis Marion & the Revolutionary War: Facts & Biography

Francis Marion was a militia leader in the American Revolution known as the 'Swamp Fox.' He employed guerrilla warfare and ambush tactics in the South Carolina backcountry.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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