Ch 3: The American Revolution Study Guide

About This Chapter

The American Revolution Study Guide chapter of this US History 1 Study Guide course is the most efficient way to study key turning points in the Revolutionary War. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you understand the essential concepts associated with the American Revolution.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering American Revolution material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn about the American Revolution. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing events and people associated with the American Revolution
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning US history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Watch each video in the chapter to review all key topics.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with the American Revolution Study Guide chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: The lessons in this chapter cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take the American Revolution Study Guide chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any US history question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about the American Revolution for a standard US history course. Topics covered include:

  • Outcomes of the battles at Lexington and Concord
  • Turning points in the Battle of Bunker Hill
  • Key points in Thomas Paine's 'Common Sense'
  • Accomplishments of the Second Continental Congress
  • The legacy of the Declaration of Independence
  • Characteristics of British Loyalists and American Patriots
  • The leadership of George Washington
  • Outcomes of the Battle of Yorktown
  • Conditions of the Treaty of Paris

10 Lessons in Chapter 3: The American Revolution Study Guide
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

1. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

2. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

3. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

4. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

5. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

6. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

Primary Source: The Boston Gazette's Coverage of the Boston Tea Party

7. Primary Source: The Boston Gazette's Coverage of the Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party of 1773 is often seen as a great catalyst for the American Revolution. Bostonians famously raided a ship carrying British tea and dumped it into the harbor rather than pay taxes on it.

Primary Source: Ron Ridenhour's Letter about the My Lai Massacre

8. Primary Source: Ron Ridenhour's Letter about the My Lai Massacre

Of all the controversies of the Vietnam War, none were greater than the My Lai Massacre in 1968. American soldiers killed hundreds of unarmed Vietnamese civilians, including women, children, and infants.

Primary Source: New York Times' Article on Halt of Bombing in Vietnam

9. Primary Source: New York Times' Article on Halt of Bombing in Vietnam

The American military believed that superior firepower, including aerial bombardments, could defeat the communist Vietnamese. Ultimately, however, it became clear that strategic bombing did not work.

Primary Source: The Treaty of Paris

10. Primary Source: The Treaty of Paris

The American Revolution officially came to an end in 1783 when the British and Americans signed the Treaty of Paris. The United States became the first, but certainly not the last, nation in history to successfully rebel against a European power.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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