Ch 4: The American Revolution: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The American Revolution chapter of this High School U.S. History Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the American Revolution of 1775-1783. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the topics involving the American Revolution required in a typical high school U.S. history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other high school U.S. history work.
  • Identify the American Revolution concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our High School U.S. History tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the American Revolution and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the Second Continental Congress, the Treaty of Paris, Washington's leadership, key battles, the Second Great Awakening or any other American Revolution topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their high school U.S. history unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in high school U.S. history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the American Revolution simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the American Revolution on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the beginnings of the American Revolution.
  • Examine events that shifted the colonists' goal to independence from Britain.
  • Take a look at the Declaration of Independence and its legacy.
  • Compare and contrast the British Loyalists and American Patriots.
  • Learn about George Washington's leadership in the Revolution.
  • Discuss the major naval battles of the Revolutionary War.
  • Take a look at Britain's last-ditch effort to win the war.
  • Learn about the Battle of Yorktown and Britain's surrender.
  • Describe the social and economic impact of the American Revolution.
  • Examine the Second Great Awakening and the shift in American religious values.

13 Lessons in Chapter 4: The American Revolution: Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

1. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

2. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

By 1775, a war had erupted between the colonies of America and British forces. Explore the importance of the Second Continental Congress and of Thomas Paine's pamphlet, Common Sense, in helping lead America toward independence.

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

3. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

The Declaration of Independence asserted the purpose of the American government, the Colonists' grievances with British rule, and signaled the newly formed country's intention to fight for democracy and self-rule. Review the declaration's text, find out who signed it, and discover the legacy of the history-changing document.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

4. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

During the American Revolution, colonists were split into two groups - Loyalists and Patriots. Explore the differing positions and demographics of each side, and the post-war fate of the Loyalists.

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

5. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

George Washington's leadership affected the battles of Trenton and Saratoga, as well as the encampment of Valley Forge. Explore these battles and who was involved, and consider the difficulties the army experienced in Valley Forge.

John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

6. John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

Naval battles in the American Revolution are something of a lost chapter in history. Find out about the world's first military submarine, the privateers of the Continental Navy, and the helpful actions of three foreign allies at sea.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

7. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

In a final attempt to win the American Revolutionary War, the British implemented the Southern Strategy following their defeat at the Battle of Saratoga. Explore Britain's Southern Strategy, the key figures during this period of the war, and the significance of the Battle of Camden.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

8. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

Explore the Treaty of Paris, officially ending the American Revolution, and how it was accomplished. Learn the roles that British General Cornwallis, the Battle of the Chesapeake, and the Battle of Yorktown played in making this happen.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

9. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

The American Revolution that occurred in North America between 1765 and 1783 led to a number of social and economic changes within the United States and around the world. Explore the political effects of the Revolutionary War, the role of Joseph Brant and Andrew Jackson in the Revolution, and the economic effects of the war.

The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

10. The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

The Second Great Awakening was launched after the American Revolution, with Americans turning their rebellious spirit toward religion. Explore the issues Americans took with traditional religious beliefs during this time period, plus how leaders such as Charles Finney and Lyman Beecher influenced a nation of evangelists, missionaries, and social activists experiencing a religious revival.

Stamp Act Congress: Definition & Resolutions

11. Stamp Act Congress: Definition & Resolutions

In 1765, the American colonists convened the Stamp Act Congress to address what they saw as increased tyranny and unfair taxation by the British. Read this lesson to learn more about what the Stamp Act Congress debated and accomplished.

The Declaratory Act of 1766: Definition & Summary

12. The Declaratory Act of 1766: Definition & Summary

In this lesson, learn about the Declaratory Act of 1766, which claimed Parliament had the absolute right to tax the colonies. We will discuss what led to the act and how it ultimately pushed both countries towards war. Take a short quiz after the lesson.

Richard Henry Lee: Quotes, Biography & Facts

13. Richard Henry Lee: Quotes, Biography & Facts

In this lesson we are looking at Richard Henry Lee. We will examine his service in the House of Burgesses, his role in the committee of correspondence, and his role in call for independence. Finally you can test your knowledge with a quiz.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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