Ch 3: The American Revolutionary War

About This Chapter

Review entertaining lessons from home or on-the-go to improve your knowledge of the American Revolution. Short quizzes and a chapter exam can check your comprehension of this war and ensure you're able to excel on a test, assignment or project.

The American Revolutionary War - Chapter Summary

This chapter closely examines the American Revolution in the 18th century by exploring social and political influences that contributed to the revolution, the impact the war had on society and major conflicts occurring during the war. Aspects of the revolution covered in our fun lessons include the Continental Army, guerrilla warfare and the American Minutemen. As you progress through the chapter, find out how well you understand the American Revolution by taking mini quizzes and a broader chapter exam. These resources are accessible 24/7 via any computer or mobile device. Utilize them at your convenience to ensure you're able to:

  • List and discuss the causes of the American Revolution
  • Explain how individuals decided to become British Loyalists or American Patriots
  • Summarize George Washington's leadership at Valley Forge, Saratoga and Trenton
  • Describe the naval battles of the American Revolution
  • Discuss reasons British Loyalists adopted the Southern Strategy at the end of the war
  • Provide a summary of the Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris
  • Detail the social and economic impact of the American Revolution
  • Share the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation

12 Lessons in Chapter 3: The American Revolutionary War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

1. Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

In this lesson, we explore the causes and the initial battles of the American Revolution, from the end of the French and Indian War up until the Declaration of Independence in July, 1776.

Primary Source: The Declaration of Independence

2. Primary Source: The Declaration of Independence

By far one of the most famous documents in American history, Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to show King George the American's justification to sever ties with Britain. It formally began the war of the American Revolution.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

3. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

Minutemen in the Revolutionary War: Definition & History

4. Minutemen in the Revolutionary War: Definition & History

In this lesson, you'll explore the history and significance of the American Minutemen. Then, test your understanding of the Revolutionary War, military tactics, American history, and our national heroes with a brief quiz.

Guerrilla Warfare in the Revolutionary War

5. Guerrilla Warfare in the Revolutionary War

There are many ways to fight a war, but are they all equally effective? In this lesson, we'll talk about guerrilla tactics and see how they were used in the American Revolution.

The Continental Army: Definition & Facts

6. The Continental Army: Definition & Facts

Learn about the Continental Army and its leader, General George Washington. This lesson describes the events leading to the Revolutionary War and the Continental Army's key role in securing independence for the United States.

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

7. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

8. John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

Naval battles in the American Revolution are something of a lost chapter in history. Find out about the world's first military submarine, the privateers of the Continental Navy, and the helpful actions of three foreign allies at sea.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

9. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

After surrendering their northern army in the American Revolution, British leaders looked to the Southern Strategy. General Charles Cornwallis hoped that loyalist forces would hold territory so he could sweep north and end the war in Virginia.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

10. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

11. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

Articles of Confederation: Strengths & Weaknesses

12. Articles of Confederation: Strengths & Weaknesses

We pay federal taxes and give more power to the federal government than we do the state because the Articles of Confederation failed miserably as the first constitution. Learn the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation here.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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