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Ch 6: The Atom in Physics: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Atom in Physics chapter of this SAT Physics Help and Review course is the simplest way to master atomic structure. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the atom in physics for the SAT.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering SAT physics material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to prepare for the SAT physics subject test. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the structure of an atom or properties of its subatomic particles
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning science (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about atoms for the SAT
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra science learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Atom in Physics chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Atom in Physics chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about atoms. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an atomic structure unit of a standard physics course. Topics covered include:

  • Early atomic theory
  • Atomic number
  • Mass number
  • Isotopes
  • Average atomic mass
  • Avogadro's number
  • Electron configurations
  • Quantum numbers
  • The Bohr model
  • Atomic spectra

15 Lessons in Chapter 6: The Atom in Physics: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Atom

1. The Atom

The physical basis that everything is composed of is called matter and the smallest unit of matter is called an atom. Learn about the atom, subatomic particles, the nucleus, elements, and the periodic table.

Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

2. Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

The current knowledge of atoms and atomic theory has been informed by many scientists going back to Aristotle and Democritus. Learn about the contributions made to early atomic theory by scientists working in more recent times, such as Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford, and Millikan.

Atomic Number and Mass Number

3. Atomic Number and Mass Number

An atom is defined as the smallest particle of an element that displays the same properties of that element. Learn about the main components of an atom (protons, neutrons, & electrons), the characteristics of each component, and how to determine the atomic number and the mass number of an atom.

Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

4. Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

Isotopes are variations of the same element with differing numbers of neutrons and, subsequently, different atomic masses. Learn how scientists consider isotopes when they calculate average atomic mass.

Electron Configurations in Atomic Energy Levels

5. Electron Configurations in Atomic Energy Levels

Electron configuration is the representation of how the electrons in an atom are arranged, which can be used to predict the properties of an element. Learn about patterns of energy levels in elements on the periodic table, how to identify the number of electrons in a neutral atom, and how to write an electron configuration for neutral atoms.

Four Quantum Numbers: Principal, Angular Momentum, Magnetic & Spin

6. Four Quantum Numbers: Principal, Angular Momentum, Magnetic & Spin

Quantum numbers describe specific properties of an electron. Learn about atomic orbital, the four quantum numbers (principal, angular momentum, magnetic, and spin), and how to write quantum numbers based on electron configuration.

The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

7. The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

The Bohr model of the atom established the existence of a positive nucleus surrounded by electrons in specific energy levels. As electrons move from higher-energy to lower-energy levels, energy in the atom is released in the form of photons. Learn about the Bohr Model, atomic spectra, and how electrons emit different colors of light.

Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

8. Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

Matter, or material substances, are identified based on their physical and chemical properties. Explore how this process works and learn how chemists use different properties to determine the classification of matter.

States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

9. States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

There are four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Explore the characteristics of each state of matter and how they relate to and differ from each other.

States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

10. States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

Matter constantly changes. Learn about the three states of matter, which are gas, liquid, and solid, and understand the differences in chemical versus physical changes in matter.

Phase Change: Evaporation, Condensation, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation & Deposition

11. Phase Change: Evaporation, Condensation, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation & Deposition

Matter exists in four states: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. There are six changes of phase that occur among these states. Learn more about the different kinds of phase change, their examples, and the energies involved in these changes.

Common Chemical Reactions and Energy Change

12. Common Chemical Reactions and Energy Change

The five common types of chemical reactions are combination, decomposition, single-replacement, double-replacement, and combustion. Explore these different reactions, how to predict reactions, and learn how energy changes.

Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

13. Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

Atoms are microscopic and challenging to count as a result. Learn about the importance of understanding the mole, which is simply a large number or quantity of something, also known as Avogadro's number, and how it helps scientists count large numbers of atoms.

Nuclear Reaction: Definition & Examples

14. Nuclear Reaction: Definition & Examples

A nuclear reaction, such as fission and fusion, affects the nucleus of an atom and changes its particles in the process. Explore the differences between nuclear reactions and chemical reactions, the differences between nuclear fission and fusion, and how they are used for energy.

Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions

15. Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions

In endothermic reactions, the system gains heat as the surroundings cool down, and in exothermic reactions, the system loses heat as the surroundings heat up. Explore the differences between these reactions and learn about chemical reactions and enthalpy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in The Atom in Physics: Help and Review.

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