Ch 31: The Civil War & the Indian Wars

About This Chapter

Use these lessons to refresh your knowledge of the factors that led to the Civil War, as well as events during the war and the Reconstruction period that followed. Also get information on conflicts between Native Americans and settlers in the western United States.

The Civil War & the Indian Wars - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter look at the causes and impact of the Civil War. Our instructors talk about events that portended the conflict, including the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin and the election of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency. You'll learn about the Emancipation Proclamation and how the war impacted the nation.

Other lessons explore Reconstruction, including how the newly-freed African Americans lived. This chapter also includes a lesson on the conflicts between settlers in the West and the Native Americans who lived there. After watching these videos, you should have an understanding of the following topics:

  • Rising tensions over slavery in the 1850s
  • The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
  • Secession of the Confederate states
  • The legacy of the Emancipation Proclamation
  • How the war impacted the economy
  • Lincoln's plans for the Union after the war
  • The South after the war
  • The Indian Wars in the West

You can watch these lessons on a computer, smartphone or tablet. Our format lets you progress at your own pace, and video tags allow you to quickly find key topics in the videos that you want to review. If you still have questions, you can contact the instructor.

10 Lessons in Chapter 31: The Civil War & the Indian Wars
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

1. Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

Uncle Tom's Cabin captured the plight of slaves in the 1850s like no other book. The novel, coupled with the Missouri Compromise and the Fugitive Slave Act, served to further strain the country, which was at a breaking point over the issue of slavery. This lesson details these events.

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

2. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

In an effort to secure their own appointments to the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas squared off in a series of seven debates in 1858. Find out why Douglas might have won in the short term but Lincoln won in the long term.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

3. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

4. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

5. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

6. How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

With the strongest and most productive demographic of society away fighting in the Civil War, the task of running homes, communities, and the nation fell to those who stayed behind. The war on the home front changed their lives forever.

President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

7. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

Before the guns of the American Civil War fell silent, President Abraham Lincoln was making plans for the reconstruction of the South. In this lesson, learn what his plans involved and the controversy surrounding them.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

8. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

Life in the South After the Civil War

9. Life in the South After the Civil War

Following the Civil War, the era of Reconstruction was a difficult time for Southerners. Their land was destroyed, their political institutions were overrun by outsiders, the economy was in transition and their society was in upheaval. It was in this climate that the Ku Klux Klan was born and the Redeemers sought to reestablish the Old South.

The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

10. The Indian Wars: Struggle Between Native Americans and Settlers

As America expanded into the West, whites often encroached on Indian land and resources. Many Native Americans defended their territory, leading to a series of conflicts known as the Indian Wars.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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