Ch 24: The Environment & Human Populations

About This Chapter

The informative video lessons in this chapter will educate middle school students about the relationship between human populations and the environment. There is a quiz accompanying each lesson along with a full chapter exam designed to ensure that each student understands the material.

The Environment & Human Populations - Chapter Summary

The short video lessons in this chapter expand upon commonplace environmental concepts. These engaging videos look at the impact that human populations have on the environment and how the effects differ in various parts of the world. Using multiple frames of reference, such as poverty and population growth, this chapter communicates substantial learning material in a fun, simple and effective way. Following every video is a lesson-specific quiz that covers the material that the student just learned, assisting in retention. There is also a cumulative exam at the end of the chapter to test their knowledge and provide feedback for any necessary review.

Chapter Lessons and Objectives

Lesson Objective
The Environment, Levels of Ecology and Ecosystems Students learn the basics on ecology and the environment.
Ecosystems, Habitats and Ecological Niches Students dig deeper into the environment and specific ecosystems.
The Human Population: Factors that Affect Population Size Students discover the causes of the size in human population.
Biotic Potential and Carrying Capacity of a Population This lesson introduces students to biotic potential and then they learn about the limits of a population.
The History of Human Population Growth and Carrying Capacity Students take a look at the past in regards to human population.
Thomas Malthus' Theory of Human Population Growth In this lesson, students discover Thomas Malthus and his population theory.
Population Density Around the World Instructors compare population density in different areas.
Sparsely Populated World Regions Students learn about areas of the world that place environmental limitations on population.
What Is Population Density? - Definition & Measurements Students get the basics on population density.
Economic Inequality: Differences in Developed and Developing Nations Students differentiate the economic inequality among nations.
Poverty, Carrying Capacity, Population Growth & Sustainability Instructors relate these elements concerning humanity and the environment to one another.
What Is Demographic Transition? - Definition & Stages Students discover the definition and process of demographic transition.
Population Characteristics of Highly Developed & Developing Countries This lesson will show students how populations differ between developed and developing nations.
Population Distribution: Rural vs. Urban Areas Students examine the populations of rural and urban areas.
Population Size: Impacts on Resource Consumption Students take a look at the effect that population has on resources.
Urban Population Growth and Compact Development This lesson has students explore rapid population growth and the idea of compact development.
Overpopulation vs. Overconsumption Instructors distinguish between different types of overpopulation.

18 Lessons in Chapter 24: The Environment & Human Populations
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Environment, Levels of Ecology and Ecosystems

1. The Environment, Levels of Ecology and Ecosystems

Ecology is the study of organisms and how they interact with the environment they live in. Explore ecology principles and the organismal, population, community, ecosystem, and biosphere levels of ecology.

Ecosystems, Habitats and Ecological Niches

2. Ecosystems, Habitats and Ecological Niches

Habitats are areas of the ecosystem where specific organisms live, while niches are the individual roles that organisms play within the ecosystem. Discover factors that affect an animal's niche and how population density impacts an ecosystem.

The Human Population: Factors that Affect Population Size

3. The Human Population: Factors that Affect Population Size

Human population refers to the number of humans on Earth, a number that has changed drastically over time due to influential factors. Discover the definition of population and learn how factors like natality, birth rate, and immigration affect population size.

Biotic Potential and Carrying Capacity of a Population

4. Biotic Potential and Carrying Capacity of a Population

A species' maximum reproductive output is its biotic potential, and similarly, the maximum population which an ecosystem is capable of supporting is its carrying capacity. Examine the similarities between these concepts and the factors contributing to them.

The History of Human Population Growth and Carrying Capacity

5. The History of Human Population Growth and Carrying Capacity

Human population growth and the earth's carrying capacity have been studied for decades through the study of demography. Learn more about demography and the important periods of human population growth--the pre-agricultural period, the agricultural period, and the industrial period--in this lesson.

Thomas Malthus' Theory of Human Population Growth

6. Thomas Malthus' Theory of Human Population Growth

Thomas Malthus (1766-1834) was an English philosopher known for his study of the Earth's population and its limits. Discover his theory, which challenged the way people understood population growth, and whether or not that theory has proven to be accurate over time.

Population Density Around the World

7. Population Density Around the World

The population density in the various areas of the world is responsible for influencing economies and the regions in which people live. Learn more about the meaning, factors of contribution, and characteristics of densely and sparsely populated density.

Sparsely Populated World Regions

8. Sparsely Populated World Regions

The reasons certain regions of the world are sparsely populated usually is due to the physical limitations of humans or economics. Learn the definition of the term sparsely populated and examine the impacts of relief, natural resources, climate, politics, and economics.

What Is Population Density? - Definition & Measurements

9. What Is Population Density? - Definition & Measurements

Population density can be measured in different ways. Learn what population density is and explore the different methods of measuring it, including arithmetic density, physiological density, and agricultural density.

Economic Inequality: Differences in Developed and Developing Nations

10. Economic Inequality: Differences in Developed and Developing Nations

Economic inequality refers to the differences in wealth between individuals and populations. Learn about economic inequality and the differences in developed nations and developing nations.

Poverty, Carrying Capacity, Population Growth & Sustainability

11. Poverty, Carrying Capacity, Population Growth & Sustainability

Poverty is defined as an economic situation in which a person cannot meet their basic needs due to a lack of financial security. Learn more about poverty and its effects on population growth, carrying capacity, and global sustainability.

What Is Demographic Transition? - Definition & Stages

12. What Is Demographic Transition? - Definition & Stages

Demographic transition reviews changes in birth and death rates as a nation experiences industrialization. Review the definition of demographic transition, and explore its stages, including pre-industrial, transitional, industrial, and post-industrial. Understand how to apply these stages to the demographic transition model.

Population Characteristics of Highly Developed & Developing Countries

13. Population Characteristics of Highly Developed & Developing Countries

Characteristics of the population in a highly developed country differ widely from those in a developing country. Learn about certain population differences including infant mortality rate, total fertility rate, replacement-level fertility, and age structure.

Population Distribution: Rural vs. Urban Areas

14. Population Distribution: Rural vs. Urban Areas

Population distribution refers to the way people are dispersed in a certain area, depending on whether they choose to live in rural or urban areas. Explore population distribution and population density, and learn the difference between rural and urban areas. Recognize how the explosion of urban areas impacts population distribution.

Population Size: Impacts on Resource Consumption

15. Population Size: Impacts on Resource Consumption

What are the things you need to survive? Humans all need resources, and in this lesson, we will discuss how the growth of the human population is influencing the natural resources we rely on.

Urban Population Growth and Compact Development

16. Urban Population Growth and Compact Development

Urban population growth, also called urbanization, occurs when there is a shift in population from a rural setting to an urban one, causing certain areas to become densely populated. Discover the issues with urbanization and possible solutions, such as compact development.

Overpopulation vs. Overconsumption

17. Overpopulation vs. Overconsumption

How many people can the Earth support? In this lesson, we will explore population growth and some of the concerns associated with this growth, including overpopulation and overconsumption.

Logistic Population Growth: Equation, Definition & Graph

18. Logistic Population Growth: Equation, Definition & Graph

Logistic population growth refers to the process of a population's growth rate decreasing as the number of individuals in the population increases. Explore the definition for logistic population growth and learn how to graph it. Use the equation to calculate logistic population growth, recognizing the importance of carrying capacity in the calculation.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in The Environment & Human Populations.

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