Login

Ch 61: The Federal Judicial System - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science

About This Chapter

Brush up on your knowledge of the federal judicial system by watching engaging video lessons. Examine the state and federal court systems, litigation strategies and more as you study for the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science test.

The Federal Judicial System - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science - Chapter Summary

This chapter can prepare you to answer questions related to the federal judicial system on the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science test. After exploring the lessons, you will be ready to:

  • Describe the jurisdiction, structure and levels of state and federal court systems
  • Explain the sources and consequences of the power of the federal judiciary
  • Identify the steps and participants in judicial decision-making
  • Analyze constitutional checks and balances of the Supreme Court's power
  • Discuss original vs. appellate jurisdiction
  • Share how Supreme Court justices and federal judges are selected
  • Examine interest-group litigation strategies
  • Explain the significance of Marbury vs. Madison

You can watch the lessons in any sequence and as often as needed to absorb the materials in this chapter. Review the lessons on your computer, or on the go via your smartphone or tablet.

9 Lessons in Chapter 61: The Federal Judicial System - ORELA Middle Grades Social Science
The State Court System of the United States: Definition & Structure

1. The State Court System of the United States: Definition & Structure

The United States has two separate court systems: the federal and the state. Each state has its own set of state courts. This lesson explains state courts, including the structure and jurisdiction of state court systems.

The Power of the Federal Judiciary: Sources & Consequences

2. The Power of the Federal Judiciary: Sources & Consequences

Federal judges and Supreme Court justices make their decisions using different rationales and theories. This lesson explores the power of the federal judiciary, including a discussion of judicial review and judicial activism.

The Federal Court System of the United States: Definition, Structure & Levels

3. The Federal Court System of the United States: Definition, Structure & Levels

The United States has two separate court systems: the federal and the state. This lesson explores the federal court system of the Unites States, including its structure and jurisdiction.

Judicial Decision Making: Steps & Participants

4. Judicial Decision Making: Steps & Participants

A case will go through several steps before it can reach the U.S. Supreme Court. This lesson explains the participants, steps, and decision making involved in the appellate process. We will examine how a case can end up in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Constitutional Checks & Balances on the Power of the Supreme Court: Definition & Examples

5. Constitutional Checks & Balances on the Power of the Supreme Court: Definition & Examples

Our federal government is divided into three branches. Each of the three branches holds certain checks and balances on the other two branches. This lesson explores the major checks and balances on the power of the United States Supreme Court.

Original Versus Appellate Jurisdiction: Definition & Differences

6. Original Versus Appellate Jurisdiction: Definition & Differences

Federal courts can have either original jurisdiction or appellate jurisdiction. Some courts have both types of jurisdiction. This lesson explains the difference between original jurisdiction and appellate jurisdiction in the federal court system.

The Selection of Supreme Court Justices and Federal Judges: Process & Tenure

7. The Selection of Supreme Court Justices and Federal Judges: Process & Tenure

All federal judges are appointed by the United States President, and must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, including the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court. This lesson explains the process of selecting federal judges and their tenure once selected.

Interest-Group Litigation Strategies: Ways to Influence Policy

8. Interest-Group Litigation Strategies: Ways to Influence Policy

Interest groups achieve their goals through a number of different ways. One strategy uses litigation in order to influence policy. This lesson explains the use of litigation by interest groups.

Marbury v. Madison: Definition, Summary & Significance

9. Marbury v. Madison: Definition, Summary & Significance

In this lesson, you'll learn about the significance of the U.S. Supreme Court case of ''Marbury v. Madison'', and how the case established the notion of judicial review.

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the ORELA Middle Grades Social Science: Practice & Study Guide course

Support