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Ch 13: The Five Senses: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The Five Senses chapter of this College Anatomy & Physiology Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the five senses. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the information about the five senses required in a typical college anatomy & physiology course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other anatomy & physiology work.
  • Identify the five senses concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our college anatomy & physiology tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the five senses and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the anatomy and functions of the nose, eyes, ears and nerves or any other five senses topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their biology learning
  • Prefer learning biology visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their five senses unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in anatomy & physiology
  • Don't have access to their biology teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the five senses simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live anatomy & physiology tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the five senses on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn how the nose is able to smell.
  • Understand how the major structures of the eyes impact vision.
  • Explain how the structures at the back of the eye help us see.
  • Describe how the optic nerve carries sensory information from the eyes to the brain.
  • Take a look at the nerves involved in the sense of sight.
  • Understand how the structures of the outer ear contribute to our ability to hear.
  • Discuss how the structures of the middle ear help us to hear.
  • Explain the role of the inner ear structures in hearing and balance.
  • Describe how hair cells, the auditory nerve and the organ of Corti help us hear.
  • Understand how the cranial nerves of the face and mouth are involved in motion and sensation.
  • Discuss the function of the Vagus nerve.

17 Lessons in Chapter 13: The Five Senses: Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

1. The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

How does the sense of smell relate to your eyes? Why can we smell something in the first place? These questions and many more will be answered as we look into the olfactory bulb, chemoreceptors, cranial nerve I, and the olfactory nerve.

The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

2. The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

Would you be able to see anything without a lens in your eye? Does the lens change shape? Does the iris? What structure gives you your eye color? Find out all of this and about things like the ciliary muscles and the cornea as we delve into this lesson.

Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

3. Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

Find out how we see the world in color, what rods and cones are, and how camera film fits into all of this. In addition, you'll find out what the retina is and what gives you the ability to see at night.

How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

4. How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

You will learn how your eyes are able to see the image in front of you thanks to special cells called photoreceptors. In addition, these receptors have very important proteins called rhodopsin and photopsin; and all of these things work together to transmit information to your optic nerve.

The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

5. The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

Find out how cranial nerve II, cranial nerve III, cranial nerve IV, and cranial nerve VI help you see and control the movement of your eyes. You'll learn if there's a difference between those cranial nerves and that of the abducens nerve, oculomotor nerve, optic nerve, and the trochlear nerve.

Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

6. Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

What is the pinna? Is it the same thing as your earlobe? Does the eardrum have anything to do with the tympanic membrane? Find out as we explore all of this and other important structures involved in the sensation of hearing as sound enters your ear.

The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

7. The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

Find out about the malleus, incus, and stapes. You'll learn about the smallest bones in your body and find out what the ossicles are for. Finally, you'll find out how the oval window plays an important role in the transmission of sound.

The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

8. The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

Learn how water is important when it comes to your inner ear, cochlea, and sense of hearing. Find out what cool names like the bony labyrinth, semicircular canals, ampulla, and vestibule mean.

The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

9. The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

In this lesson, you'll learn the most important things about cranial nerve VIII, the auditory nerve and the Organ of Corti. In addition, you'll realize that even though you may not like it, your ears are quite hairy thanks to hair cells.

Cranial Nerves of the Face and Mouth: Motion and Sensation Functionality

10. Cranial Nerves of the Face and Mouth: Motion and Sensation Functionality

We wouldn't be able to talk, taste, chew, or swallow without the cranial nerves of our face and mouth. Find out how these nerves help us move our tongue and enjoy everything from kissing to food to conversation.

Cranial Nerves: The Vagus Nerve and its Functionality

11. Cranial Nerves: The Vagus Nerve and its Functionality

Find out what the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) does in your body. While perhaps not as impressive, you'll also find out what the accessory nerve (cranial nerve XI) does and why it is important to the vagus nerve.

What is the Pupil of the Eye? - Definition & Function

12. What is the Pupil of the Eye? - Definition & Function

You may not think there is much to the pupil of the eye, but it's a window to your emotions and a key feature in managing the amount of light that gets into your eye. Learn about the pupil and all that it does in this lesson.

Peripheral Vision: Definition & Problems

13. Peripheral Vision: Definition & Problems

You use your peripheral vision every day, but do you know how it works? This lesson dives in to the details and brings you up to speed on everything you need to know about peripheral vision.

Accommodation Reflex of the Eye: Definition & Purpose

14. Accommodation Reflex of the Eye: Definition & Purpose

The accommodation reflex of the eye is the involuntary response your eye has when it switches from an object far away to one that is closer to you. This lesson discusses what this reflex is and why it's important.

What Is Visual Acuity? - Definition, Scale & Tests

15. What Is Visual Acuity? - Definition, Scale & Tests

Visual acuity is a measure of how clear and sharp your vision is. To standardize this, it's measured at different distances so that the results from many people can be averaged together. This lesson will explain visual acuity and the different tests used to measure it.

Adequate Stimulus for Sensory Receptors

16. Adequate Stimulus for Sensory Receptors

This lesson will describe the basics of how your sensory receptors communicate with your brain. Readers will discover which types of stimuli trigger different sensory neurons and what the adequate stimulus for a particular sensory neuron is.

What Is Binocular Vision? - Examples & Advantages

17. What Is Binocular Vision? - Examples & Advantages

This lesson discusses binocular vision and what it has to do with 3-dimensional sight. It compares binocular with monocular vision, and explores the advantages of each using examples of animals with each type of vision.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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