Ch 11: The Five Senses

About This Chapter

Watch video lessons and learn about the different aspects of the five senses - sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. These video lessons are short and engaging and make learning easy!

The Five Senses - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Can you name all five senses? You probably can, but can you explain how each of them work or what components make them up? That might be trickier. In this chapter, you will learn all about the five senses (sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell), their functions and the different components of each of them. You'll watch lessons that focus on things like the structures of the eye, external ear structures and sensation in the face. Some of the specific things you'll learn in this chapter include:

  • How the olfactory bulb works
  • How information is sent via the optic nerve
  • The structure of the external ear
  • The ear's connection to balance
  • How facial movements occur
  • Nerves of the face and mouth

VideoObjective
The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose Discover how the sense of smell really works.
The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures Examine the large structures in the eye, such as the cornea, pupil, lens and iris.
Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea Explore what happens in the back of the eye to aid eyesight.
How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve Find out what the optic nerve does.
The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements Study how sight works.
Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures Analyze the external structures in the ear.
The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions Take a look at the middle ear and how hearing occurs.
The Ear: Sense of Balance and Inner Ear Discover the job of the inner ear and how it is connected to balance.
The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve Explore the roles of hair cells, the organ of Corti and the auditory nerve.
Cranial Nerves of the Face and Mouth: Motion and Sensation Functionality Examine how motion occurs and sensations are felt in the mouth and face.
Cranial Nerves: The Vagus Nerve and its Functionality Learn more about the vagus nerve and how it functions.

9 Lessons in Chapter 11: The Five Senses
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

1. The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

Sense of smell is the process of interpreting odor molecules based on information that is received from chemoreceptors and nerves. Learn about the sense of smell, chemoreceptors, olfactory epithelium, odor solubility, olfactory nerve, olfactory bulb, and how odor molecules that pass through the nose are processed and interpreted by the brain.

Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

2. Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

The external part of your ear is what the sound waves reach first, so they have an important function in the hearing process. Discover how the hearing process works when you are talking to your friend on the phone and the role of the ear's external structures, including the pinna, the meatus (a.k.a. the ear canal), and the tympanic membrane.

The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

3. The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

The eardrum is capable of transmitting sound waves in the form of vibrations to the middle ear. The ossicles in the middle ear amplify and transmit the sound to the inner ear for further processing. Learn about the ear (structures & hearing functions), the middle ear, ossicles (malleus, incus, & stapes), and the role that the oval window plays in the transportation of sound to the inner ear.

The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

4. The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

The inner ear is the innermost part of the ear involved in giving humans a sense of balance and hearing. Learn about the fluid in the ears, the inner ear and bony labyrinth, the cochlea, and the vestibule and semicircular canals.

The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

5. The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

The ear utilizes hair cells on its surfaces to catch sounds that are then sent to the auditory nerve, which in turn sends signals to the brain for interpretation of the sound that was heard in an instant. Learn about the structures and functions of the ears, such as the Organ of Corti, the hair cells of the inner ear, and how the auditory nerves process the signals to the brain.

The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

6. The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

The eyes are covered by several layers of protective tissues that help with the reflection of light and maintaining eyesight at different levels of light. Learn about the structure of the eyes, the description of the cornea, and how helps in maintaining eyesight.

Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

7. Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

The receptors of the back of the eye enable humans to see the world in color and in detail. Study the retina, rods, the cones and fovea, and metaphors to help you remember what each photoreceptor is responsible for.

How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

8. How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

The receptors of the eye conduct information by catching light particles and converting the information into electrical signals that the brain can process into an image. Learn about photoreceptors, photopsin, rhodopsin, and the optic nerve.

The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

9. The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

The light entering the eyes enables the body's sense of sight to perceive motion and images through the processes in the optic nerves and the brain. Learn about the concepts of the sense of sight, the different nerves involved in seeing, and how eye movements are affected by the nerves.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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