Ch 1: The Gilded Age (1865-1877): Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The Gilded Age chapter of this American History Since 1865 Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the Gilded Age. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long, and they teach all of the late 19th century developments required in a typical American history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other American history work.
  • Identify the Gilded Age history concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our American History Since 1865 Tutoring Solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the Gilded Age and earn better grades. This resource can help students, including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the Reconstruction, the Homestead Act of 1862, the transcontinental railroad, or any other Gilded Age history topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their Gilded Age history unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in American history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the Gilded Age simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the Gilded Age on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and re-watch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine the goals of the Reconstruction along with the successes and failures of the period.
  • Explore the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
  • Study the Homestead Act of 1862 and the Frontier Thesis.
  • Determine how the expansion of the transcontinental railroad affected the people who built and traveled it.
  • Describe conflicts between settlers, the government and Native Americans.
  • Learn about the Dawes Act and other Native American policies.

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: The Gilded Age (1865-1877): Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

1. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

2. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

3. Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

Between the mid-1800s and the turn of the 20th century, the American frontier opened and closed abruptly. What factors influenced this land rush, and how did it help shape American history?

Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

4. Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

After decades of wrangling, plans were finalized for construction of a transcontinental railroad during the Civil War. After completion in 1869, the railroad changed many aspects of American life, for better or worse.

Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

5. Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

In the second half of the 19th century, the federal government attempted to control Native American nations. This led to violent conflicts known together as the Indian Wars. Learn about famous battles, and the attempt to 'civilize' tribes through various policies.

Gilded Age History

6. Gilded Age History

In this lesson, we will learn about the Gilded Age. We will identify when this period took place and highlight the central themes and developments associated with it.

History of the Jazz Age

7. History of the Jazz Age

In this lesson we will learn about the Jazz Age. We will identify the central characteristics of this time period, and we will examine key developments that took place during this exciting time in American history.

Battle of Little Bighorn: Definition, Facts & Summary

8. Battle of Little Bighorn: Definition, Facts & Summary

On June 25, 1876 the United States army suffered one of its greatest and most famous defeats in the Sioux Wars. At Little Bighorn, General George Armstrong Custer and his forces were annihilated by the Sioux chief Sitting Bull and his warriors. In this lesson we examine this battle in more detail.

What Caused the Battle of Little Bighorn?

9. What Caused the Battle of Little Bighorn?

The Battle of Little Bighorn is one of the most famous military engagements in US history. But what actually started it? In this lesson, we'll explore the history leading up to this famous fight.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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