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Ch 4: The Great Gatsby Literary Analysis

About This Chapter

''The Great Gatsby'' Literary Analysis chapter of this ''The Great Gatsby'' Study Guide course is the most efficient way to analyze the literary aspects of this novel. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you understand the essential literary analysis of ''The Great Gatsby.''

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering The Great Gatsby literary analysis material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to analyze the literary facets of The Great Gatsby. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing events and people associated with the literary analysis of The Great Gatsby
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning American literature (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Watch each video in the chapter to review all key topics.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with The Great Gatsby Literary Analysis chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: The lessons in this chapter cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take The Great Gatsby Literary Analysis chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any American literature question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about the literary analysis of The Great Gatsby for a standard American literature course. Topics covered include:

  • What literary critics say about The Great Gatsby
  • The presence of modernism, feminism, materialism, and Marxism in this novel
  • How the American Dream and social class are conveyed throughout the story
  • An analysis of the first and last lines of The Great Gatsby
  • The importance of eyes
  • A study of the moral, love, and conflicts in the novel
  • How cars, fashion, and alcohol play into the story The Great Gatsby
  • The presentation of carelessness, corruption, greed, and lies throughout this work

20 Lessons in Chapter 4: The Great Gatsby Literary Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Literary Criticism of The Great Gatsby

1. Literary Criticism of The Great Gatsby

''The Great Gatsby'' is one of the most discussed novels in American history. It has inspired a large amount of literary criticism, and this lesson will discuss some of the most common critical approaches to the book.

Modernism in The Great Gatsby

2. Modernism in The Great Gatsby

What makes ''The Great Gatsby'' so great? Among other things, it is a fine example of the Modern novel, dealing expertly with several of the main theoretical pillars of the Modernist movement.

The American Dream in the Great Gatsby

3. The American Dream in the Great Gatsby

The American Dream refers to the hopes people have for their lives as Americans. In this lesson, you will learn about the way the American Dream plays out in the lives of people in F. Scott Fitzgerald's book The Great Gatsby.

First Line of The Great Gatsby: Analysis

4. First Line of The Great Gatsby: Analysis

In this lesson, we will analyze the first line from the classic novel ''The Great Gatsby.'' Is the advice given in it arrogant, humble or self-righteous? And how does it set the tone of the story and foreshadow later events? Read on to find out.

The Ending & Last Line of The Great Gatsby: Analysis

5. The Ending & Last Line of The Great Gatsby: Analysis

'So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.' This is considered one of the greatest closing lines in American literature. This discussion will connect the line to connotations of the American dream, human experience in general, and specific context from The Great Gatsby.

Eyes in The Great Gatsby: Significance & Analysis

6. Eyes in The Great Gatsby: Significance & Analysis

This lesson explores the motif of eyes and the themes of looking and watching in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 masterpiece, ''The Great Gatsby.'' The lesson confirms the notion that eyes play a significant role as Fitzgerald's characters strive to see and be seen.

Social Class in The Great Gatsby

7. Social Class in The Great Gatsby

''The Great Gatsby,'' by F. Scott Fitzgerald, highlights the dramatic differences between social classes during the 1920s. In this lesson, you will discover the role of social status as it pertains to the lives of the characters in this story.

Conflicts in The Great Gatsby

8. Conflicts in The Great Gatsby

Conflict is a common aspect of daily life. It's practically unavoidable! Just like the real world, conflict is a large part of F. Scott Fitzgerald's ''The Great Gatsby''. This lesson explores various external and internal conflicts the characters in the novel experience.

Materialism in The Great Gatsby

9. Materialism in The Great Gatsby

What do Madonna and 'The Great Gatsby' have in common? Materialism! Madonna sings of being a 'material girl' living in 'a material world,' while the characters in 'The Great Gatsby' are swept into a vortex of acquisitiveness which robs them of more substantive gains.

Cars in The Great Gatsby

10. Cars in The Great Gatsby

'The Great Gatsby' by F. Scott Fitzgerald is known for its rich symbolism. One of the symbols he used to represent the characters and 1920s America is the automobile. This lesson explores the importance of the cars Fitzgerald included in his novel.

Fashion in The Great Gatsby

11. Fashion in The Great Gatsby

The classic novel 'The Great Gatsby' is set in the glamorous period of the Roaring Twenties. In this lesson, you will learn how the fashion trends of this period reveal aspects of the characters' personalities in the novel.

Carelessness in The Great Gatsby

12. Carelessness in The Great Gatsby

This lesson examines the theme of carelessness in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 masterpiece, The Great Gatsby. It asserts that the theme of carelessness plays a vital role in understanding the novel's major characters and the ways they interact.

Feminism in The Great Gatsby

13. Feminism in The Great Gatsby

'Feminism' refers to the belief that women should have the right to do anything that men can do. This lesson examines the role of feminism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel 'The Great Gatsby.'

Moral of The Great Gatsby

14. Moral of The Great Gatsby

This lesson explores the moral of the novel, 'The Great Gatsby,' and how it pertains to the American Dream. The reader will develop a better understanding of the author's purpose after reviewing this lesson.

Love in The Great Gatsby

15. Love in The Great Gatsby

This lesson examines themes of love in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 masterpiece, 'The Great Gatsby.' In the book, love is neither idealistic nor pure, but rather depicted as a byproduct of timing and personal desires and as an impossible dream.

Corruption in The Great Gatsby

16. Corruption in The Great Gatsby

This lesson explores the theme of corruption in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 masterpiece, The Great Gatsby. It argues that corruption in the novel reflects Fitzgerald's examination of a world undergoing rapid, disorienting change.

Greed in The Great Gatsby

17. Greed in The Great Gatsby

Greed lies at the heart of F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 masterpiece, 'The Great Gatsby.' In Fitzgerald's iconic tale of the Roaring Twenties, greed is not a character flaw. It is an essential way of life.

Marxism in The Great Gatsby

18. Marxism in The Great Gatsby

This lesson explores Marxism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 classic, 'The Great Gatsby'. The lesson argues that using the principles of Marxism can help readers better understand Fitzgerald's examination of class conflicts.

Alcohol in The Great Gatsby

19. Alcohol in The Great Gatsby

''The Great Gatsby'' by F. Scott Fitzgerald is set in the 1920s, a time of increasing prosperity, partying, and alcohol consumption in the United States. This lesson focuses specifically on the role of alcohol in the story.

Lies in The Great Gatsby

20. Lies in The Great Gatsby

In this lesson, we will analyze the many lies told in the classic novel ''The Great Gatsby''. Two characters lie to conceal their true identities and who really killed Myrtle Wilson, and another lies by simply keeping silent. Read on to find out more.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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