Ch 11: The Harlem Renaissance and Literature: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Harlem Renaissance and literature chapter of this American Literature Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the Harlem Renaissance. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the Harlem Renaissance and literature.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering American literature material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn American literature. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the Harlem Renaissance and its influence on American identity and culture
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning American literature (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the Harlem Renaissance and literature
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra American literature learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the the Harlem Renaissance and Literature chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Harlem Renaissance and Literature chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any Harlem Renaissance and literature question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to questions including:

  • What defined the Harlem Renaissance?
  • How did the Harlem Renaissance influence American novels and poetry?
  • Who was W.E.B. DuBois and what were some of his literary, political and social works?
  • Who was Countee Cullen and how does he exemplify the concept of 'heritage'?
  • What defined the work of Zora Neale Hurston, especially Their Eyes Were Watching God?
  • Who was Langston Hughes and how was his poetry representative of the Jazz Age?
  • What role did Claude McKay play in the Harlem Renaissance and what was important about his poem 'America'?

14 Lessons in Chapter 11: The Harlem Renaissance and Literature: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

1. The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

The Harlem Renaissance was a movement in the 1920s and 1930s during which there was an explosion of African-American art and literature. This lesson looks at the themes, causes, and important figures of the Harlem Renaissance.

Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

2. Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

The Harlem Renaissance exposed the world to everyone from W.E.B. DuBois to Ella Fitzgerald. In this lesson, we'll explore one of the movement's most iconic and resonant poems, Countee Cullen's 'Heritage.'

Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

3. Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

Zora Neale Hurston's novel 'Their Eyes Were Watching God' is a famous Harlem Renaissance novel that examines race and gender issues through the eyes of its main character, Janie Crawford. This lesson gives a synopsis of the novel and examines how it approaches race and gender.

Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

4. Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

Langston Hughes was a popular poet from the Harlem Renaissance. His Jazz Age poems, including 'Harlem' and 'I, Too, Sing America,' discussed the racism facing African Americans in the 1920s and '30s.

Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

5. Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

Claude McKay was an influential Harlem Renaissance poet. His poems 'America' and 'If We Must Die' explored the complicated relationship African Americans had with the world around them.

W.E.B. Du Bois: Theories, Accomplishments & Double Consciousness

6. W.E.B. Du Bois: Theories, Accomplishments & Double Consciousness

W.E.B. Du Bois was an important figure in American civil rights history, and his idea of the double consciousness delved into what it felt like to live as a black person in a white people's world. Learn more about his life and works in this lesson.

Alain Locke: Biography, Poems & Books

7. Alain Locke: Biography, Poems & Books

In this lesson, we will review the biography of Alain Locke. We will then discuss his philosophy on race relationships, his role in the Harlem Renaissance, and some of his writings.

James Weldon Johnson: Biography, Poems & Books

8. James Weldon Johnson: Biography, Poems & Books

This lesson will examine the life of James Weldon Johnson, and will review his written work, primarily his books and poetry. Read on, and then test yourself with the quiz!

Zora Neale Hurston: Quotes & Biography

9. Zora Neale Hurston: Quotes & Biography

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) is best known for her 1937 novel ''Their Eyes Were Watching God,'' but she wrote more than 50 short stories, plays, and essays. Let's take a close look at the life of the beloved, fearless, Southern writer.

Sweat by Zora Neale Hurston: Summary & Analysis

10. Sweat by Zora Neale Hurston: Summary & Analysis

This lesson includes a brief background of the short story 'Sweat' and its author, a summary of the story, and analysis of some of its major elements. Then you'll be able to test your newfound knowledge with a quiz!

Zora Neale Hurston: Books & Poems

11. Zora Neale Hurston: Books & Poems

The diverse literary works of American author and folklorist Zora Neale Hurston include an autobiography, poetry, plays, and novels. In this lesson, we will explore the life and career of this celebrated Harlem Renaissance author.

Zora Neale Hurston: Facts & Accomplishments

12. Zora Neale Hurston: Facts & Accomplishments

Zora Neale Hurston is one of the great American writers and was a leading force in the Harlem Renaissance movement of the early twentieth century, which brought a number of black American writers, musicians, and artists to the forefront of American culture. Read on for a few important facts about Hurston and about some of the important things that Hurston accomplished in her career!

Spunk by Zora Neale Hurston: Summary & Analysis

13. Spunk by Zora Neale Hurston: Summary & Analysis

''Spunk,'' a short story by Zora Neale Hurston, is a juicy tale about a love triangle that goes terribly wrong. In this lesson, we will learn more about the characters and the plot and analyze the story's major elements.

Mulatto by Langston Hughes: Poem & Analysis

14. Mulatto by Langston Hughes: Poem & Analysis

Langston Hughes is probably the most well-known voice of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African American writers living in New York in the 1920s and 30s. ''Mulatto'' isn't as well-known as Hughes's other poems, but its sharp commentary and jazzy tone are worth examining. Let's take a look.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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