Ch 17: The Human Body's Five Senses

About This Chapter

Watch short videos and learn about the five senses of the human body. Use the self-assessment quizzes to see how well you've learned the material or what topics you need to review.

The Human Body's Five Senses - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Explore the human body's five senses with the short and entertaining lessons found in this chapter. You'll get an in-depth look at the structures in the eye, the anatomy of the ear, and the senses of taste, smell and touch. Each lesson breaks down large concepts into easily digestible chunks that make learning about each of the five senses simple and easy. These lessons are flexible, too, so you can even watch them on the go with your mobile device or tablet. In this chapter, you'll learn:

  • How the receptors at the back of the eye work
  • What contributes to our sense of smell
  • How the external ear is structured
  • What part of the ear provides a sense of balance
  • How touch and taste senses work

Video Objective
The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures Discover how eyesight works and get details on the structure of the eye.
Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea Explore the purposes for the receptors at the back of the eye.
How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve Determine the importance of photoreceptors and the process they use to conduct information to the optic nerve.
The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements Detail the ways that cranial nerves work to control movement of the eyes.
The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose Examine the nerves and receptors that help us smell.
Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures Take a closer look at the external structures of the ear.
The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions Find out how the structures of the middle ear play a role in hearing.
The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing Assess the role of the inner ear in helping humans hear and maintain balance.
The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve Describe the components of the ear and their uses.
Taste, Touch and Smell Get an overview of these three senses.

10 Lessons in Chapter 17: The Human Body's Five Senses
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

1. The Eye and Eyesight: Large Structures

Would you be able to see anything without a lens in your eye? Does the lens change shape? Does the iris? What structure gives you your eye color? Find out all of this and about things like the ciliary muscles and the cornea as we delve into this lesson.

Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

2. Receptors of the Back of the Eye: Retina, Rods, Cones & Fovea

Find out how we see the world in color, what rods and cones are, and how camera film fits into all of this. In addition, you'll find out what the retina is and what gives you the ability to see at night.

How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

3. How Receptors of the Eye Conduct Information via the Optic Nerve

You will learn how your eyes are able to see the image in front of you thanks to special cells called photoreceptors. In addition, these receptors have very important proteins called rhodopsin and photopsin; and all of these things work together to transmit information to your optic nerve.

The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

4. The Sense of Sight: Motion, Nerves and Eye Movements

Find out how cranial nerve II, cranial nerve III, cranial nerve IV, and cranial nerve VI help you see and control the movement of your eyes. You'll learn if there's a difference between those cranial nerves and that of the abducens nerve, oculomotor nerve, optic nerve, and the trochlear nerve.

The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

5. The Sense of Smell: Olfactory Bulb and the Nose

How does the sense of smell relate to your eyes? Why can we smell something in the first place? These questions and many more will be answered as we look into the olfactory bulb, chemoreceptors, cranial nerve I, and the olfactory nerve.

Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

6. Anatomy of the Ear's External Structures

What is the pinna? Is it the same thing as your earlobe? Does the eardrum have anything to do with the tympanic membrane? Find out as we explore all of this and other important structures involved in the sensation of hearing as sound enters your ear.

The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

7. The Ear: Middle Structures and Hearing Functions

Find out about the malleus, incus, and stapes. You'll learn about the smallest bones in your body and find out what the ossicles are for. Finally, you'll find out how the oval window plays an important role in the transmission of sound.

The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

8. The Inner Ear: Sense of Balance and Hearing

Learn how water is important when it comes to your inner ear, cochlea, and sense of hearing. Find out what cool names like the bony labyrinth, semicircular canals, ampulla, and vestibule mean.

The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

9. The Ear: Hair Cells, Organ of Corti & the Auditory Nerve

In this lesson, you'll learn the most important things about cranial nerve VIII, the auditory nerve and the Organ of Corti. In addition, you'll realize that even though you may not like it, your ears are quite hairy thanks to hair cells.

Taste, Touch & Smell: Proprioception & the Somatosensory System

10. Taste, Touch & Smell: Proprioception & the Somatosensory System

How do taste, touch and smell work? Also, what is proprioception? Throughout this lesson, you'll get a detailed description on each of these remarkable senses.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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