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Ch 6: The Jacksonian Democracy

About This Chapter

The Jacksonian Democracy chapter of this U.S. History 1 Study Guide course is the most efficient way to study the presidencies, political parties and candidates of this era. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus it includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you understand essential concepts associated with the Jacksonian democracy.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering Jacksonian Democracy material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn about the Jacksonian democracy. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing events and people associated with the Jacksonian democracy
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning U.S. history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Watch each video in the course to review all key topics.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with the Jacksonian Democracy chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: The lessons in this course cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take the Jacksonian Democracy chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any U.S. history question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about the Jacksonian democracy for a standard U.S. history course. Topics covered include:

  • The presidency of John Quincy Adams
  • Jacksonian America and the panic of 1837
  • The Age of the Common Man
  • Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act
  • The presidencies of Harrison and Van Buren

7 Lessons in Chapter 6: The Jacksonian Democracy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

1. President John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1824

The election of 1824 and its candidates played a huge role in the election of John Quincy Adams as president. In this lesson, look at the dramatic turn in presidential politics and the not-so-remarkable presidency of this public servant.

President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

2. President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

In this lesson, we will explore the dirty politics of the 1828 election and the Age of the Common Man in American politics. Discover how this election changed American politics forever.

The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

3. The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

In this lesson, we'll discuss Jackson's forced removal of Native Americans from their land in the east to new territory west of the Mississippi River.

Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

4. Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

In this lesson, we will discuss President Andrew Jackson's economic policies, including his determination to close the Bank of the United States and the financial panic of 1837.

Presidents Martin Van Buren and William Henry Harrison

5. Presidents Martin Van Buren and William Henry Harrison

Watch this lesson to learn about Martin Van Buren's administration (1837-1841), the elections of 1836 and 1840, and the short-lived presidency of William Henry Harrison.

Primary Source: The Indian Removal Act of 1830

6. Primary Source: The Indian Removal Act of 1830

The young American government did not consider Native Americans to be citizens and forcibly moved them off of new areas for white settlement. This led to outright conflict with many tribes throughout the 1800s.

Primary Source: Letter from Chief John Ross of the Cherokee Nation

7. Primary Source: Letter from Chief John Ross of the Cherokee Nation

During Andrew Jackson's presidency, systematic efforts to relocate Native Americans westward created significant strife. Some chiefs agreed to relocation, while others chose to fight against the American government.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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