Ch 5: The Making of a New Nation (1776-1800): Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Making of a New Nation (1776-1800) chapter of this AP U.S. History Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the making of our constitution. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the making of a new nation.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering AP U.S. history material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn AP U.S. history. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the origins of the U.S. Constitution and the making of our nation
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the making of our nation
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Making of a New Nation chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Making of a New Nation chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about the making of our nation. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a making of a new nation unit of a standard AP U.S. history course. Topics covered include:

  • The Articles of Confederation
  • The Constitutional Convention
  • The U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights
  • George Washington, John Adams and other key players
  • Domestic and international conflicts of 1776-1800

23 Lessons in Chapter 5: The Making of a New Nation (1776-1800): Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

1. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

2. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

3. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

4. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

5. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

6. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

7. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

George Washington and the New United States Government

8. George Washington and the New United States Government

George Washington was the United States' first president. He knew everything he did would set the stage for future presidents of the country. A heavy weight was on his shoulders, and much of what he established in his two terms set the precedent for presidents today.

Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

9. Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

Although President Washington warned against the nation falling into political factions, the different views of the Constitution held by Alexander Hamilton and the Federalists and Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans set the path for the two-party system that the U.S. has today.

The French Revolution, Jay Treaty and Treaty of San Lorenzo

10. The French Revolution, Jay Treaty and Treaty of San Lorenzo

In the U.S., early foreign affairs were of incredible importance. For the young nation to survive, they had to exist in a world with tense relations. Should the new nation get involved in foreign wars? How do they negotiate with foreign powers? This lesson looks at the early foreign relations of the United States.

The Whiskey Rebellion and Battle of Fallen Timbers

11. The Whiskey Rebellion and Battle of Fallen Timbers

In the early days of the U.S., President Washington and the new government were tested by foreign and domestic issues. How these issues were dealt with would establish the young nation's position. Domestically, the Whiskey Rebellion and the Battle of Fallen Timbers demonstrated how rebellion and territorial issues would be decided.

President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

12. President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

John Adams was an important founder of the United States. In many ways, he was the voice of the Revolution. As president, he had some proud shining moments and one major blight on his legacy.

The Five Geographic Regions of Georgia

13. The Five Geographic Regions of Georgia

This lesson will explore the five distinct geographic regions in the state of Georgia. Each area has its own individual resources and features that make for a diverse landscape. From mountainous areas, to farmland, to beaches on the Atlantic coast, Georgia - the largest state east of the Mississippi River - has much to offer.

The Land Ordinance of 1785: Definition & History

14. The Land Ordinance of 1785: Definition & History

Learn about the Land Ordinance of 1785 and how it influenced the development of the United States. When you are finished, take the quiz and see what you've learned.

The Meaning of the 4th of July

15. The Meaning of the 4th of July

Through this lesson, you will learn about the origins of the American Independence Day, and gain insight into why and how the day is celebrated in the United States. When you are done with the lesson, you can test your new knowledge with the quiz.

The Presidential Election of 1796

16. The Presidential Election of 1796

In this lesson, we'll look at the Presidential Election of 1796 and the many 'firsts' in American politics it saw. You'll then be able to take a short quiz to gauge what you learned.

Concurrent Powers: Definition & Examples

17. Concurrent Powers: Definition & Examples

Concurrent powers are those powers given to both states and the federal government by the U.S. Constitution. We'll look at some examples of concurrent powers in this lesson.

Abigail Adams: Biography, Facts & Accomplishments

18. Abigail Adams: Biography, Facts & Accomplishments

Abigail Adams was the wife of President John Adams and the mother of John Quincy Adams. She proved to be much more than a figure head first lady, as she had great influence with President Adams.

Anti-Federalists: Definition, Views & Leaders

19. Anti-Federalists: Definition, Views & Leaders

In this lesson, you'll learn the definition of the Anti-Federalists. You'll also learn about their views in opposition to the Constitution drafted in 1787 and about prominent leaders in the movement.

The Revolution of 1800: Definition & Overview

20. The Revolution of 1800: Definition & Overview

In that year's presidential election, the 'Revolution of 1800' proved that the young United States could transfer power peacefully from one political party to another. Examine this exciting election and its outcomes in this lesson.

Baron Von Steuben: Quotes, Facts & Biography

21. Baron Von Steuben: Quotes, Facts & Biography

Baron von Steuben was a Prussian military officer who served under Frederick the Great. He helped train troops in the American Revolution and wrote a manual on military training.

Yazoo Land Fraud: Definition & Summary

22. Yazoo Land Fraud: Definition & Summary

The Yazoo land fraud sounds like something from a Dr. Seuss book. But instead of whimsical characters and silly rhymes, the Yazoo land fraud is a story of politics, bribery, and scandal. This lesson defines and summarizes the Yazoo land fraud.

The Toleration Act of 1649

23. The Toleration Act of 1649

Have you ever heard of the concept, 'separation of Church and state'? When the English began settling in the New World, the Maryland colony helped pioneer this idea through the Toleration Act of 1649.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the AP US History: Help and Review course

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