Ch 6: The Organizing Process

About This Chapter

The lessons in this chapter outline the processes of union formation and representation. Multiple-choice self-assessment quizzes at the end of each lesson help solidify the material.

The Organizing Process - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Learn the process and the necessary steps for employees to become unionized. But what happens when a group no longer wants union representation? This chapter will cover all those details. You'll learn about:

  • The theories and models behind unions
  • Union organization and structure
  • How worker's rights lead to the formation of unions
  • The importance of members and their roles and responsibilities
  • Operating rules of conduct according to the National Labor Relations Board
  • The process of establishing and abolishing union representation
  • Why employees sometimes choose to terminate their union representation

Video Objective
Theories & Models of Union Formation Explain the various theories and models behind the development of unions.
Organizing a Union: Activities & Tactics Explore the initial steps required to organize a union.
Workers' Rights: Union Organization & Management Relations See how workers' rights drives the formation of unions, and look at the resulting required interaction between unions and management.
Roles and Duties of Union Members and Leadership Examine the structure of unions and the part members play.
National Labor Relations Board: Policies & Conduct Learn more about the policies and acceptable conduct according to the NLRB.
Unionizing Process: Certification, Decertification Describe the process a group of employees must follow to become unionized as well as what must be done to terminate representation.
Union Decertification: Process & Policies Explore the circumstances that often lead to decertification.

7 Lessons in Chapter 6: The Organizing Process
Theories & Models of Union Formation

1. Theories & Models of Union Formation

In this lesson, we look at why unions are formed, the beliefs that members have about the union, and what motivates workers to unionize. Three theories are detailed: alienation theory, scarcity consciousness theory, and the Wheeler model.

Organizing a Union: Activities & Tactics

2. Organizing a Union: Activities & Tactics

Unions have methods of organizing in the workplace without a government supervised closed ballot election. Let's take a look at these methods and how companies can attempt to counter these attempts at labor organization.

Workers' Rights: Union Organization & Management Relations

3. Workers' Rights: Union Organization & Management Relations

Employees are one of the primary stakeholders to a corporation. In this lesson, you will learn about the importance of workers' rights and how unions can create a joint relationship with management.

Roles and Duties of Union Members and Leadership

4. Roles and Duties of Union Members and Leadership

Union membership can offer some important benefits to workers. In this lesson, we'll discuss the purposes of a union, the roles members may play in a union and the effects of union representation in an organization.

National Labor Relations Board: Policies & Conduct

5. National Labor Relations Board: Policies & Conduct

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is a federal agency that protects employees from employer violations that affect employee wages and working conditions. Employees do not necessarily have to be unionized to seek protection.

Unionizing Process: Certification, Decertification

6. Unionizing Process: Certification, Decertification

Union representation requires certification and ending union representation requires decertification. In this lesson, you'll learn about the processes involved in certification and decertification. A short quiz follows.

Union Decertification: Process & Policies

7. Union Decertification: Process & Policies

In this lesson, we will look at the process of how a union decertification election works. We will also discuss some of the reasons why an election may occur, along with the rights of employees throughout the process.

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