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Ch 9: The Progressive Era & American Imperialism

About This Chapter

Learn how America attempted to create a better society and extend its power and influence around the globe. Watch the short video lessons and complete the quick quizzes to learn about the Progressives and American imperialism.

The Progressive Era & American Imperialism

Everyone's had a teddy bear at some time, right? Maybe you don't know where that name came from, though. In the early 1900s, the Progressives attempted to create a better society by calling for more government involvement in economic, social and political affairs. The teddy bear was named after President Theodore Roosevelt, who was not only a supporter of the Progressives, but also an outdoorsman who reportedly refused to shoot a cornered bear on a hunting trip.

In this chapter, you can learn all about the Progressives, the Muckrakers and trust busting. In addition, you can explore the women's suffrage movement and meet the notable feminist leaders, including Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, who helped women earn the right to vote.

Imperialism is a country's policy of extending its influence and power through either diplomatic means or military strength. Leaders in the United States were warned about the dangers of involvement in foreign situations as far back as George Washington. However, many believed that America needed to take steps to keep its place among leading nations. A naval arms race began, and the rest is history, as they say.

Imperialism led the United States to involvement in the Spanish-American War. Theodore Roosevelt had fought in this war, with the Rough Riders, before becoming President. The U.S. fought this war to gain control and influence in the Philippines and the Caribbean, where Spain had previously ruled.

As this chapter closes, you can find out what caused the start of World War I and how the United States tried unsuccessfully to not get involved. After you watch the video presentations, make sure you round out your study by completing the quizzes to get immediate feedback on your progress.

12 Lessons in Chapter 9: The Progressive Era & American Imperialism
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Theodore Roosevelt & the Progressives: Definition and Political Agenda

1. Theodore Roosevelt & the Progressives: Definition and Political Agenda

In the early 20th century, the United States had become an increasingly industrialized society. Progressive reformers believed that many social, economic and political issues required federal government regulation. Learn how Progressive Era reformers, including President Theodore Roosevelt and his Square Deal, worked to correct problems that accompanied this rapid development and expansion.

The Muckrakers of the Progressive Era: Definition and Influence

2. The Muckrakers of the Progressive Era: Definition and Influence

A spirit of reform marked the Progressive Era from around 1900 to 1917. It was in this spirit that muckrakers, who were influential journalists, worked to reveal injustices and oversights in American society. Learn how muckrakers raised awareness of America's social, economic and political problems.

Trust Busting and Government Regulations on Economy & Industry in the Progressive Era

3. Trust Busting and Government Regulations on Economy & Industry in the Progressive Era

During the Progressive Era, from around 1900-1917, government intervened in the economy, breaking up trusts, and regulating railroads and other industries. Learn how government worked to curb the power of unregulated big business and provide tariff and banking reforms.

Progressive Politics: Definition, Reforms & Amendments

4. Progressive Politics: Definition, Reforms & Amendments

During the Progressive Era, from around 1900-1917, political reformers pushed for an end of abuse of power in politics and government. Learn how political reforms of the Progressive Era helped make government more responsive to the people, prompting changes at every level of government.

African Americans in the Progressive Era: Issues & Leaders

5. African Americans in the Progressive Era: Issues & Leaders

During the Progressive Era, from approximately 1900 to 1918, progress for many African Americans was hard to come by. Explore some of the inequalities African Americans faced and learn about notable African-American leaders of the era including Ida B. Wells, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois.

Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

6. Women's Suffrage & Early Feminism: Movement, 19th Amendment & Leaders

The women's suffrage movement became one of the most prominent areas of reform during the Progressive movement. Learn about the work of early feminists, changing roles of women and notable women suffrage leaders who pushed for women's right to vote.

American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

7. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

8. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

9. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

10. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

11. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

12. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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