Ch 11: The Reconstruction Era After the American Civil War

About This Chapter

The video lessons in this chapter can help your students learn about the period of Reconstruction following the American Civil War. The lessons are divided into the different topics students should learn about if they wish to understand this subject as a whole.

The Reconstruction Era after the American Civil War - Chapter Summary

The Civil War is a pivotal event in American history, but the period following the Civil War is just as significant in many respects. This era is known as Reconstruction, and your students can learn about it by watching the video lessons contained in this chapter.

In these lessons, students will learn about the main issues that affected Reconstruction policies and political controversies. Lessons will address the policies themselves, as well as the effects of these policies on different regions and groups. The lessons will teach your eighth graders about topics such as the:

  • Republican Reconstruction plan
  • Compromise of 1877
  • Reconstruction amendments
  • Effects of Reconstruction on the South, North, and African Americans
  • Homestead Act of 1862
  • Significance of the Morrill Land-Grant Acts
  • Dawes Act of 1887
  • Biography of Hiram Revels

Included in each lesson are video tags that students can use to save and return to key points of information. There is also a hard copy of each lesson included in the chapter that can be used to review lesson transcripts later on. Once you are confident in your students' understanding of these topics, you can test their knowledge on some key points by taking the chapter's practice quizzes.

10 Lessons in Chapter 11: The Reconstruction Era After the American Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction: The Reconstruction Acts & Civil Rights Act

1. The Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction: The Reconstruction Acts & Civil Rights Act

In this lesson, we will explore the Radical Republicans' plan to reconstruct the South after the Civil War. We will discuss Congress' efforts to extend the Freedmen's Bureau and to pass the Civil Rights and Reconstruction Acts.

Compromise of 1877: Definition, Summary & Results

2. Compromise of 1877: Definition, Summary & Results

Political deals between parties have become commonplace in American politics. In 1877, one such political bargain resolved a disputed election, ended Reconstruction, and changed the fate of recently freed African Americans. Develop an understanding of the Compromise of 1877 and test your knowledge with a short quiz.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

3. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

4. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

5. Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

In this lesson, we'll explore the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on the people of the South. We'll look at rights and opportunities for African Americans, economic growth, resentment and violence, and the sharecropping system.

How American Reconstruction Affected the North

6. How American Reconstruction Affected the North

After the Civil War, the United States shifted into a period of Reconstruction. While the effects of Reconstruction were very obvious in the South, they also had a significant impact on states in the North.

Hiram Revels: History & Biography

7. Hiram Revels: History & Biography

This lesson discusses Hiram Revels, the first African American member of the United States Senate. Learn more about Revels and his work as a politician, minister, and educator, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

What is the Homestead Act of 1862? - Definition & Summary

8. What is the Homestead Act of 1862? - Definition & Summary

Define the Homestead Act of 1862, learn about its historical origins, and understand the challenges individuals faced as they established property claims on the Great Plains during the 19th century.

Morrill Land-Grant Acts: Impact on the Growth of Colleges & Universities

9. Morrill Land-Grant Acts: Impact on the Growth of Colleges & Universities

Ever wonder how colleges and universities were started? In this lesson, we'll look at the Morrill Land-Grant Acts and how they contributed to the establishment of many American colleges, including state universities and historically black colleges.

The Dawes Act of 1887: Definition & Summary

10. The Dawes Act of 1887: Definition & Summary

The U.S. has a long history of implementing plans with the 'best of intentions.' This is especially true for its long and tragic relationship with Native Americans. One of the starkest examples of this is the Dawes Act of 1887.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support