Ch 3: The Relationship Between Major & Career

About This Chapter

Use the video lessons and self-assessment quizzes in this chapter to learn how your choice of major can impact your career options. Our guidance counselors discuss common program requirements, tips for supplementing your studies and more.

The Relationship Between Major & Career: Chapter Summary

Continue charting your career path with lessons designed to help you explore the relationship between your choice of major and the job options awaiting you. Our guidance counselors explain how an undergraduate degree in almost any field can be used to develop transferable job skills and prepare you for graduate school. You can also discover which careers require certain majors with lessons on the following:

Supplementing Your Major

It might set your mind at ease to realize that the skills and experiences you acquire in college can be more important than the subject matter you choose to study. We can show you how to supplement your major with electives, work experience or research, even if you pick a field of study that doesn't directly align with your career choice. We'll also help you identify skill sets, such as problem-solving abilities and an attention to detail, that are applicable to a variety of fields.

Assessing Career Options

Get an overview of some popular degree options in fields including the humanities, fine arts, engineering, math, sciences and social sciences. You'll learn about common course requirements for these majors along with some sample job titles that require them. If you're curious about what self-directed majors or other types of nontraditional programs entail, we'll help you examine these options as well, so you can get a better idea of which degree types might offer the best return on your investment.

Considering Graduate School

If you're thinking about continuing your education after earning a bachelor's degree, use the questions provided by our guidance counselors to assess whether or not graduate school is the only viable option for entering or advancing your career. If the answer is yes, we'll show you what to consider when choosing a major. We can also help you determine how much the possibility of graduate school can affect your undergraduate studies if you're unsure of your career choice.

12 Lessons in Chapter 3: The Relationship Between Major & Career
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How Much Does Your College Major Affect Your Career?

1. How Much Does Your College Major Affect Your Career?

What happens when your chosen major doesn't line up with the career you want to pursue? In this lesson, we'll look at the two types of knowledge necessary for career success, and how your major aligns with each of them.

What to Do When Your Major and Career Choice Don't Match

2. What to Do When Your Major and Career Choice Don't Match

What happens when you figure out that your college major doesn't match up with the career path you want to be on? In this lesson, we'll look at the difference in major and career and how to get into a career that's not a match for your major.

Do You Need A Graduate Degree? - Questions to Consider

3. Do You Need A Graduate Degree? - Questions to Consider

Graduate school can be a great opportunity for some people, but it's not for everyone. In this lesson, we'll examine the costs and benefits of graduate school, how to figure out if grad school is right for you, and decisions to be made about attending it.

How Should Graduate School Plans Affect Your College Major?

4. How Should Graduate School Plans Affect Your College Major?

Graduate school plans can play a large role in choosing a college major. In this lesson, we'll examine what graduate school is and how plans to attend grad school can affect major choices in two different scenarios.

Evaluating a Career's Cost and Benefits

5. Evaluating a Career's Cost and Benefits

Choosing a career takes a lot of thought. One way to consider different careers to to compare the cost and benefits of them. Watch this lesson to figure out how to determine the return on investment for different careers.

What Can I Do with a Humanities Degree? - Typical Courses & Careers

6. What Can I Do with a Humanities Degree? - Typical Courses & Careers

The field of Humanities is a broad field of human interest studies. There are many different directions students of the humanities can take when searching for careers after graduation.

What Can I Do with a Fine Arts Degree? - Typical Courses & Careers

7. What Can I Do with a Fine Arts Degree? - Typical Courses & Careers

This lesson will review different majors within a fine arts degree program. In addition to majors available, possible careers in the fine arts will also be investigated.

Careers in the Engineering Field: Typical Courses & Degrees

8. Careers in the Engineering Field: Typical Courses & Degrees

While there are many different fields of engineering, they all focus on design, development, and manufacturing. This lesson covers the details of many different types of engineering.

Careers in Math: Typical Courses & Degrees

9. Careers in Math: Typical Courses & Degrees

This lesson will introduce students who are considering a major in mathematics to the types of degrees available. Careers stemming from mathematics degrees will also be discussed.

Careers in the Sciences: Typical Courses & Degrees

10. Careers in the Sciences: Typical Courses & Degrees

Natural sciences use the scientific method to investigate concepts and ideas. This lesson will review the many types of career options and coursework a student of science can expect.

Careers in the Social Sciences: Typical Courses & Degrees

11. Careers in the Social Sciences: Typical Courses & Degrees

Students interested in pursuing social sciences degrees will benefit from this lesson. We define social science, discuss typical courses, and identify common majors and possible careers related to the degree.

Nontraditional Degree Programs and Career Options

12. Nontraditional Degree Programs and Career Options

Nontraditional degree programs are programs that do not follow traditional degree paths or concepts. This lessons covers three nontraditional degree options, their coursework and possible careers associated with each.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Transferring credit to the school of your choice

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the How to Choose a Career: Guidance Counseling course

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