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Ch 3: The Road to Revolution (1700-1774): Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Road to Revolution (1700-1774) chapter of this AP US History Homework Help course helps students complete their road to revolution homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your road to revolution homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your road to revolution homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • American Enlightenment
  • First Great Awakening
  • French and Indian War
  • Sons of Liberty
  • Boston Massacre
  • Boston Tea Party
  • First Continental Congress

9 Lessons in Chapter 3: The Road to Revolution (1700-1774): Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

1. The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

The American Enlightenment was a time of intellectual and social revolution in the 18th century that changed ideas about government (particularly in the U.S.) and left a lasting legacy. Learn about the Enlightenment, or Age of Reason, with regard to how thinkers like John Locke changed the perception of government, Thomas Paine explained Enlightenment philosophy, and Benjamin Franklin widely published ideas of this period in U.S. history.

The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

2. The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

The First Great Awakening was a religious revival in British colonies in America during the 1730s-1740s that emphasized human decision-making in matters of religion and morality. Explore the teachings of influential preachers like Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield and the religious movement's impact on American independence.

The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

3. The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

The French and Indian War not only resulted in changes in territorial divisions, it also affected relations between England and its colonies. Understand the causes of this war between European powers and its effects on the New World.

Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

4. Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

In 1763, the new British Prime Minister, George Grenville, imposed taxes on the colonists in America to help pay the bills from the French and Indian War. Explore the Sugar Act, Currency Act, Quartering Act, and Stamp Act, and discover how the colonists resisted taxation without representation.

Boston Massacre: Declaratory & Townshend Acts

5. Boston Massacre: Declaratory & Townshend Acts

Tensions in the American Colonies culminated in a clash between colonist rioters and British soldiers, resulting in five colonists' deaths. Explore the details of the Declaratory and Townshend Acts and discover how they led to the Boston Massacre.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

6. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

After the Boston Massacre, tensions in the American Colonies died down, only for the Tea Act to reignite them. Explore the causes of the Boston Tea Party, the effects of the Intolerable Acts, and the assembly of the First Continental Congress.

Period of Salutary Neglect: Definition & Effects

7. Period of Salutary Neglect: Definition & Effects

The term salutary neglect was coined in 1775 in Great Britain. Understand the definition of salutary neglect, explore the historical background of the phrase, and examine the effects on colonial development.

What was the Stamp Act of 1765? - Definition, Summary & Significance

8. What was the Stamp Act of 1765? - Definition, Summary & Significance

The Stamp Act of 1765 was a tax on paper goods in the American colonies to replace Britain's revenue lost in the French and Indian War, but it was met with violent opposition and became a linchpin for the American Revolution. Discover the significance of the Stamp Act and the Colonies response of violent protests, the Stamp Act Resolves and the Stamp Act Congress, while British Parliament countered with the Declaratory Act as the two sides drew closer to war.

Who was Crispus Attucks? - Biography, Facts & Timeline

9. Who was Crispus Attucks? - Biography, Facts & Timeline

Almost nothing is known about his life before 1770--but his legacy afterwards has been immortalized. Crispus Attucks' status as the 'first to defy, the first to die' in the American Revolution has become a part of the permanent mythology of the American Revolution.

Chapter Practice Exam
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