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Ch 3: The Road to Revolution (1700-1774)

About This Chapter

Watch U.S. history video lessons and learn about our country's early history and what led up to the American Revolutionary war. Each lesson is accompanied by a short multiple-choice quiz you can use to check your understanding of these topics.

The Road to Revolution

Before we became the United States of America, we belonged to England. Then the American Revolution occurred and things changed forever. These lessons cover the period from 1700-1774 which directly proceeded the war. You'll learn why the colonists decided to separate themselves from England and what things made the War for Independence inevitable.

Start off your studies with the road to the revolution. Learn about the changes in society and the colonists attitudes during the Seven Years' War. Discover how a religious movement fueled the desire to become free. Then, study the French and Indian War - the cause, the effects of the war and its effects on the minds of the colonists.

With the tensions rising and colonists' minds tuned into the idea of becoming an independent nation, it didn't take much to get the colonists up in arms. See how tensions quickly escalated with Britain's new policies, such as the Stamp Act. Then, discover how such issues lead to the creation of organizations - like the Sons of Liberty - and acts of resistance - like boycotts.

However, these rather benign instances were just the start. With so much anger toward the throne, it was only a matter of time before people rebelled. Learn how violence first erupted against Britain in the colonies with the Boston Massacre. These lessons cover the Boston Tea Party, the First Continental Congress and the Intolerable Acts. After completing the lessons, continue on to study the Revolutionary War. Thanks for watching!

7 Lessons in Chapter 3: The Road to Revolution (1700-1774)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

1. The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

The American Enlightenment was a time of intellectual and social revolution in the 18th century that changed ideas about government (particularly in the U.S.) and left a lasting legacy. Learn about the Enlightenment, or Age of Reason, with regard to how thinkers like John Locke changed the perception of government, Thomas Paine explained Enlightenment philosophy, and Benjamin Franklin widely published ideas of this period in U.S. history.

The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

2. The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

The First Great Awakening was a religious revival in British colonies in America during the 1730s-1740s that emphasized human decision-making in matters of religion and morality. Explore the teachings of influential preachers like Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield and the religious movement's impact on American independence.

The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

3. The French and Indian War: Causes, Effects & Summary

The French and Indian War not only resulted in changes in territorial divisions, it also affected relations between England and its colonies. Understand the causes of this war between European powers and its effects on the New World.

Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

4. Sons of Liberty: Resistance to the Stamp Act and British Rule

In 1763, the new British Prime Minister, George Grenville, imposed taxes on the colonists in America to help pay the bills from the French and Indian War. Explore the Sugar Act, Currency Act, Quartering Act, and Stamp Act, and discover how the colonists resisted taxation without representation.

Boston Massacre: Declaratory & Townshend Acts

5. Boston Massacre: Declaratory & Townshend Acts

Tensions in the American Colonies culminated in a clash between colonist rioters and British soldiers, resulting in five colonists' deaths. Explore the details of the Declaratory and Townshend Acts and discover how they led to the Boston Massacre.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

6. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

After the Boston Massacre, tensions in the American Colonies died down, only for the Tea Act to reignite them. Explore the causes of the Boston Tea Party, the effects of the Intolerable Acts, and the assembly of the First Continental Congress.

Primary Source: The Boston Gazette's Coverage of the Boston Tea Party

7. Primary Source: The Boston Gazette's Coverage of the Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party of 1773 is often seen as a great catalyst for the American Revolution. Bostonians famously raided a ship carrying British tea and dumped it into the harbor rather than pay taxes on it.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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