Ch 16: The Roaring 20s (1920-1929): Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Roaring 20s (1920-1929) chapter of this AP US History Homework Help course helps students complete their Roaring 20s homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your Roaring 20s homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your Roaring 20s homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • American culture, economy and politics of the 1920s
  • Prohibition
  • Organized crime
  • Art, pop culture and literature
  • The Harlem Renaissance
  • The Ku Klux Klan
  • The Red Scare
  • The Scopes and Scottsboro trials

13 Lessons in Chapter 16: The Roaring 20s (1920-1929): Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
1920s American Culture: City Life & Values

1. 1920s American Culture: City Life & Values

In the 1920s, America started experiencing a rapid growth in urbanization and innovation that glorified city life and introduced new values. Learn about how the 1920s had a thriving economy, increased freedoms for women, and cultural growth, such as the emergence of jazz, the Harlem Renaissance and the Art Deco style.

American Economy in the 1920s: Consumerism, Stock Market & Economic Shift

2. American Economy in the 1920s: Consumerism, Stock Market & Economic Shift

The American economy in the 1920s boomed thanks to advances in manufacturing, advertising, and financing. Learn about the economic shift that saw the rise of consumerism and Coolidge Prosperity, and then explore the rise and eventual crash of the stock market.

American Politics in the 1920s: Transition, Corruption & the Teapot Dome Scandal

3. American Politics in the 1920s: Transition, Corruption & the Teapot Dome Scandal

In the 1920s, following World War I, the United States strove to return to a period of normalcy, but instead, experienced a decade marked by perversion. Explore American politics in the 1920s to understand why this was a period of transition and corruption. Review the Teapot Dome Scandal and learn about presidents Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge.

Schools, Media & Culture in the 1920s

4. Schools, Media & Culture in the 1920s

Explore how a new morality aimed at living free influenced schools, media, and culture in the United States in the 1920s. Discover more about the new morality while looking at its impacts and changes made on education, consumerism, and the media.

Prohibition of the 1920s: Definition, 18th Amendment & Results

5. Prohibition of the 1920s: Definition, 18th Amendment & Results

The Prohibition movement of the 1920s made the sale and transport of alcohol in the United States illegal from 1919 to 1933. Explore the movement through a definition, the significance of the passage of the 18th Amendment, and its eventual results.

American Organized Crime of the 1920s

6. American Organized Crime of the 1920s

During the 1920s, there was a spike in organized crime activity due to the nationwide Prohibition and those capitalizing on the demand for alcohol. Learn more about how Prohibition fueled American organized crime, the major players involved such as Al Capone, and how the repeal of Prohibition led to a decrease in organized crime in the aftermath.

American Art, Pop Culture & Literature of the 1920s

7. American Art, Pop Culture & Literature of the 1920s

America in the 1920s was characterized by massive social change. Discover how new styles of art, forms of literature, and aspects of pop culture influenced society.

Art and Culture of the Harlem Renaissance: Artists, Poets, Authors & Music

8. Art and Culture of the Harlem Renaissance: Artists, Poets, Authors & Music

The Harlem Renaissance, named for originating in Harlem, New York, was an African-American artistic and intellectual movement that contributed to the culture, fashion, music, and art of the 1920s and 30s. Learn more about the artists, musicians, and writers of the movement and how their work shaped the Harlem Renaissance.

Immigration Control Initiatives from 1882 to 1924

9. Immigration Control Initiatives from 1882 to 1924

Immigrating to America was a common dream for many throughout history, but many immigrants faced significant struggles upon arrival. Learn about the various immigration control acts instituted in the U.S. between 1882 and 1924, as well as the importance of Ellis Island as a center for immigration.

The Ku Klux Klan, Eugenics and Nativism: Definition, Movement & Social Reactions

10. The Ku Klux Klan, Eugenics and Nativism: Definition, Movement & Social Reactions

In the 1920s, some U.S. citizens responded to technological advances, rising immigration, and a shifting moral culture by putting foreign ideas on trial, exploring the science of race, and building an invisible empire. Learn about these movements, including the Ku Klux Klan, eugenics, and nativism.

The Red Scare of the 1920s: Definition, Summary & Causes

11. The Red Scare of the 1920s: Definition, Summary & Causes

Following WWI, many Americans were concerned about the potential of a revolution starting due to the influences of radical leftists. Explore the state of the nation following WWI and the lingering uneasiness felt by many Americans, and how these factors led to the Red Scare.

The Scopes Trial and Scottsboro Trials: Summaries & Significance

12. The Scopes Trial and Scottsboro Trials: Summaries & Significance

The Scopes Trial (1925) and the Scottsboro Trial (1931-1937) were two crucial legal cases in American history that highlighted tensions in social values and differences in public opinion at the time. Discover the ins and outs of each case, why they are considered so important, and how they brought about change in the US legal system.

Women's Christian Temperance Union

13. Women's Christian Temperance Union

During the 1800s, a powerful women's organization emerged in the United States. The Women's Christian Temperance Union was responsible for bringing about significant social change in the United States.

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