Ch 10: The Sentencing Process in Criminal Justice Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Sentencing Process in Criminal Justice chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach about the array of sentencing options used in the United States in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes, and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Sentencing Process in Criminal Justice chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Criminal punishment and sentencing Purposes of criminal punishment; incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation, and restoration goals of sentencing
Tuesday Traditional and alternative sentencing options Uses of incarceration, probation, capital punishment, shock probation, drug court, restitution, community service, and treatment programs
Wednesday Structured and indeterminate sentencing Determinate, voluntary or advisory, and presumptive sentencing models; parole variables and the purposes of indeterminate sentencing
Thursday Intermediate sanctions and capital punishment Uses of electronic monitoring, intensive supervision, boot camp, treatment facilities, and halfway houses; arguments for and against capital punishment
Friday Sentencing issues and trends Prison overcrowding, efforts to reduce prison populations, and recent sentencing trends

7 Lessons in Chapter 10: The Sentencing Process in Criminal Justice Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Types & Goals of Contemporary Criminal Sentencing

1. Types & Goals of Contemporary Criminal Sentencing

Criminal law is designed to punish wrongdoers, but punishment takes different forms and has varying goals. This lesson explores the types and goals of contemporary criminal sentencing.

Traditional & Alternative Criminal Sentencing Options

2. Traditional & Alternative Criminal Sentencing Options

Once a criminal defendant pleads guilty or is found guilty by a jury, he will be sentenced. This lesson discusses the various criminal sentencing options, including traditional and alternative sentencing options.

Structured Criminal Sentencing: Definition, Types & Models

3. Structured Criminal Sentencing: Definition, Types & Models

Structured criminal sentencing is a method of determining an offender's sentence. It classifies offenders using different factors, then imposes a sentence as specified by law. This lesson explains structured criminal sentencing.

Indeterminate Criminal Sentencing: Definition, Purpose & Advantages

4. Indeterminate Criminal Sentencing: Definition, Purpose & Advantages

In the United States, most states use indeterminate sentencing. This means that judges sentence offenders to terms of imprisonment identified only as a range, rather than a specific time period. This lesson explains indeterminate sentencing.

Intermediate Sanctions: Definition, Purpose & Advantages

5. Intermediate Sanctions: Definition, Purpose & Advantages

Intermediate sanctions are a form of punishment used in the criminal justice system. These criminal sentences fall between probation and incarceration. This lesson explains intermediate sanctions.

Arguments For and Against Capital Punishment

6. Arguments For and Against Capital Punishment

The use of capital punishment in the United States has fluctuated throughout the years. The death penalty is a controversial criminal law topic. This lesson explores some of the popular arguments for and against the use of capital punishment.

Sentencing Issues and Trends in the U.S. Justice System

7. Sentencing Issues and Trends in the U.S. Justice System

Criminal sentencing trends over the last 30 years have resulted in a 500% increase in our nation's prison population. This lesson explores newer strategies that are designed to ease prison overcrowding while achieving public safety.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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