Ch 2: The Slavery Debate of the 1800s: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Slavery Debate of the 1800s chapter of this Civil War and Reconstruction Help and Review course is the simplest way to examine the rising tension over slavery. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the slavery debate of the 1800s.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering Civil War and Reconstruction history material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn about this era of American history. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding what caused the sectional tensions that would eventually lead to war
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the slavery debate of the 1800s
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Slavery Debate of the 1800s chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Slavery Debate of the 1800s chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about the slavery debate of the 1800s. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a slavery debate of the 1800s unit of a standard Civil War and Reconstruction course. Topics covered include:

  • The Missouri Compromise of 1820
  • Outcomes of the Mexican-American War
  • President Fillmore's Compromise of 1850
  • Important figures in the abolitionist movement
  • Causes and effects of 'Bloody Kansas'
  • The Dred Scott v. Sanford decision
  • John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: The Slavery Debate of the 1800s: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

1. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

2. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

3. President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

Following President Zachary Taylor's death, Millard Fillmore took office. He supported the Compromise of 1850 that added new states from the Mexican cession and attempted to resolve long-standing controversies over slavery.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

4. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

5. Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

The events in the Kansas territory were a microcosm of the violent forces shaping the United States in the decade of the 1850s, forces that would ultimately lead to a disintegration of the Union itself. This lesson details what has come to be known as Bleeding Kansas and its impact on the issue of slavery.

Dred Scott v. Sanford: Case Summary & Decision

6. Dred Scott v. Sanford: Case Summary & Decision

In this lesson, we will explore the famous Dred Scott v. Sanford Supreme Court case. We will learn about the case's background, the court's findings, and the impact of this landmark decision.

John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

7. John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

John Brown was a man of strong convictions - so strong that he was willing to fight, to kill, and to die for them. These abolitionist beliefs led him from Kansas to Virginia, where he would pay the ultimate price. This lesson tells that story.

David Walker the Abolitionist: Biography & Quotes

8. David Walker the Abolitionist: Biography & Quotes

In this lesson, you'll learn about David Walker, an African-American man who was against slavery. You'll learn about his life and written works that showcased his belief in the abolition of slavery.

Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe: Summary & Themes

9. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe: Summary & Themes

Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel, ''Uncle Tom's Cabin,'' is credited for winning millions of Americans to the anti-slavery movement prior to the US Civil War. Stowe's novel is a story of cruelty and hope, of faith and despair, and of humanity in the face of inhumanity.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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