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Ch 12: The Start of the United States

About This Chapter

Review the video and text lessons in this chapter to get a good understanding of the start of the United States. The topics covered in this chapter include the American Revolution, Plymouth Rock settlement and Articles of Confederation.

The Start of the United States - Chapter Summary

How much do you know about the start of the United States? This chapter can help you find out! Lessons provide an in-depth exploration of important events in U.S. history, including North American exploration, the American Revolution and creation of the Articles of Confederation. Take time to review these lessons to boost your knowledge of this nation's beginning. Doing so enables you to:

  • Describe influential North American explorers and their failed attempts to establish New World colonies
  • Discuss the Mayflower voyage and misplaced Plymouth Colony
  • Share the timeline, major events and social and economic impact of the American Revolution
  • Provide details about the Articles of Confederation and Northwest Ordinance
  • Detail the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion
  • Explain what occurred during the Constitutional Convention
  • Examine the ratification of the Constitution and the new U.S. government
  • Summarize and discuss the history of the Federalist Papers

If you're concerned about your ability to squeeze this review of the start of the United States into your busy schedule, don't worry! This chapter enables you to review the lessons anytime and anywhere you can access the Internet. Ensure you have a good grasp of concepts covered in the lessons by revisiting them as often as you'd like. And test your knowledge of lesson concepts by taking short multiple-choice quizzes and a practice chapter exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 12: The Start of the United States
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Native American History: Origins of Early People in the Americas

1. Native American History: Origins of Early People in the Americas

Because the first humans and civilizations got their start in Africa and the Middle East, historians and anthropologists have had to figure out how Native Americans got to the Americas. In this lesson we look at the three prevailing theories of the earliest migration to the New World.

North American Exploration & Failed Colonies of France & England

2. North American Exploration & Failed Colonies of France & England

Between 1497 and 1607, the rulers and leading citizens of European nations fought to establish their own empires in North America, as Spain had been doing for 100 years in South America. Learn about influential explorers and their failed attempts to establish their own New World colonies.

The Mayflower and the Plymouth Rock Settlement

3. The Mayflower and the Plymouth Rock Settlement

Find out how much you know about the Pilgrims and their voyage. In this lesson, you'll learn about the misplaced Plymouth Colony, its escaped indentured servants, and the Wampanoag Indians who saved their lives.

The American Revolution: Timeline & Major Events

4. The American Revolution: Timeline & Major Events

In this lesson, we will take a big-picture look at the American Revolution. We will place it within the context of a timeline, and we will highlight major events and themes.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

5. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

6. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

7. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

8. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

9. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

The Federalist Papers: History, Writers & Summary

10. The Federalist Papers: History, Writers & Summary

The Federalist Papers were a collection of political essays from the 18th century written by several Founding Fathers of the United States. In this lesson, we'll learn more about the Federalist Papers and why they are still important today.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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