Ch 1: THEA Test: Understanding Words & Phrases

About This Chapter

The engaging video lessons in this chapter can offer guidance as you prepare for the THEA test in Texas. Learn more about words and phrases, and take self-assessment quizzes and a chapter exam to measure your comprehension.

THEA Test: Understanding Words & Phrases - Chapter Summary

This comprehensive overview of words and phrases is designed to increase your understanding and strengthen your chances of success on the THEA test. Watch the lessons in this chapter to ensure you're ready to:

  • Use context to determine the meaning of words
  • Understand words by their relationships
  • Determine and find the meaning of words using structural analysis, affixes and roots
  • Know how to construct meaning with context clues, prior knowledge and word structure
  • Define connotation, denotation, idiom, simile and metaphor
  • Interpret figurative language in fiction
  • Identify types of irony and define allusion and illusion

The lessons can be tailored to your studying needs. You can take an in-depth look at words and phrases if you haven't studied in awhile, or skip to specific topics using timelines if you only need a quick review of this subject area.

THEA Test: Understanding Words & Phrases Chapter Objectives

A primary objective of this chapter is to ensure you understand words and phrases, which is a subject area explored in the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) Internet-Based Test (IBT). This section, one of three total sections, consists of 40 multiple-choice questions and requires a score of at least 230 to pass.

To increase your chances of passing and showing you're ready to excel as an entering freshman at your Texas public college or university of choice, utilize chapter resources like self-assessment quizzes and practice exams. They can help you reinforce topics covered in the lessons and give you access to the kinds of questions you'll see on the exam.

12 Lessons in Chapter 1: THEA Test: Understanding Words & Phrases
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

1. How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

With diligence and intrepid ingenuity, you can use context to ascertain the purport of a word. In other words, in this lesson, we'll find out how to use context to figure out what words mean.

Understanding Words By Their Relationships

2. Understanding Words By Their Relationships

Many words in the English language have multiple meanings. To really understand a word, we have to understand the relationship between particular words. In this lesson, we will examine this through connotations, denotations, synonyms, and analogies.

Using Structural Analysis to Determine the Meaning of Words

3. Using Structural Analysis to Determine the Meaning of Words

Discover the importance of using structural analysis to understand unfamiliar words. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to divide unknown words into known pieces to comprehend their overall meanings.

Using Affixes and Roots to Find the Meaning of Words

4. Using Affixes and Roots to Find the Meaning of Words

In this lesson, we will learn how to understand the meaning of words by breaking them down into the parts that form them. This requires knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, and affixes, which are parts we add to roots to make new words.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

5. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

6. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

What is an Idiom? - Definition & Examples

7. What is an Idiom? - Definition & Examples

Break a leg! It takes two to tango. In this lesson, we'll learn all about idioms, those colorful figures of speech that play with language and take on a meaning of their own.

Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

8. Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

In this lesson, we will discuss how to interpret figurative language in fiction. We will explore several types of figurative language and learn how to identify them.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

9. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

10. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

11. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

12. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the THEA Test: Practice & Study Guide course

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