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Ch 27: Theories of Abnormal Psychology

About This Chapter

Watch free video lessons and learn about the different theories used in abnormal psychology. These lessons are just a portion of our online study guide and video collection.

Theories of Abnormal Psychology - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

The videos in this chapter have been designed to provide you with an easy-to-understand overview of the theories associated with abnormal psychology. As you make your way through the presentations, you'll have the opportunity to examine a variety of different psychological models and weigh their strengths and weaknesses. You'll also have the chance to learn about the physiological basis for mental illness. When you've finished with the series, you should be able to identify and discuss the following theories:

  • Psychodynamic model
  • Humanistic-existential model
  • Behavioral and learning model
  • Biological model
  • Sociocultural model

VideoObjective
Psychoanalytic Schools Approach to Psychopathology TheoryLearn about the Freudian psychoanalytic school of thought, as well as neo-Freudian psychodynamic ideas and psychopathology.
The Psychodynamic Model and Abnormal FunctioningDemonstrate your understanding of the psychodynamic model, including its emphasis on human experiences and relationships.
Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and WeaknessesConduct a critical examination of the psychodynamic model as a tool for explaining abnormal human behaviors and feelings.
Humanistic Approach to Psychopathology TheorySummarize this creative and holistic approach to the study of mental disorders.
Assessing the Humanistic-Existential Model: Strengths and LimitationsExamine the pros and cons of the humanistic-existential model, including how it compares to previous models.
The Behavioral Model and Abnormal FunctioningDemonstrate your understanding of behavior modification and its use in treating atypical human conduct.
Assessing the Behavioral/Learning Model in PsychotherapyExplain the relationship between behavioral changes and learning.
Sources of Biological Abnormalities: Genetics and EvolutionDescribe how evolution, genetics and viruses have led to biological abnormalities.
Assessing the Biological Model: Strengths and WeaknessesWeigh the advantages and disadvantages of treating mental illnesses with biological or physical therapies.
The Sociocultural Model and Abnormal FunctioningDiscuss how cultural and societal factors can contribute to mental illness.
Strengths and Weaknesses of the Sociocultural ModelExplain how successful or unsuccessful the sociocultural model is as a rationale for mental illness.
Physiological Causes and Explanations for Mental IllnessIdentify the biological or organism-related roots of mental illness.
The Cognitive Model in Psychology and Abnormal FunctioningDescribe how distorted human perceptions can lead to abnormal behaviors.
Assessing the Cognitive Model in Psychology: Strengths and WeaknessesProvide an overview of the benefits and drawbacks of cognitive therapy.
14 Lessons in Chapter 27: Theories of Abnormal Psychology
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Psychoanalytic Schools Approach to Psychopathology Theory

1. Psychoanalytic Schools Approach to Psychopathology Theory

Here, we will explore the basic tenants of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic theories as they relate to psychopathology. Two techniques for treatment are also explored briefly.

The Psychodynamic Model and Abnormal Functioning

2. The Psychodynamic Model and Abnormal Functioning

There are many ways to view the causes and treatments of psychological disorders. In this lesson, we'll look closer at the psychodynamic model of psychology and its benefits and drawbacks.

Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

3. Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

When people think about psychology, many immediately think of Sigmund Freud. But, how good were his ideas? In this lesson, we'll look at the psychodynamic model of psychology and its strengths and weaknesses.

Humanistic Approach to Psychopathology Theory

4. Humanistic Approach to Psychopathology Theory

Here, we look at what gave rise to humanism and some of the field's basic ideas. We will also look into how humanism views psychopathology, as well as how it treats it.

Assessing the Humanistic-Existential Model: Strengths and Limitations

5. Assessing the Humanistic-Existential Model: Strengths and Limitations

Much of psychology focuses on the negative parts of human experience, but the humanistic-existential model of psychology looks at the positive potential of humans. In this lesson, we'll look at the strengths and weaknesses of the model.

The Behavioral Model and Abnormal Functioning

6. The Behavioral Model and Abnormal Functioning

What causes mental illness? Why do some people have psychological problems, while others don't? In this lesson, we'll look at one theory of abnormal psychology, the behavioral model.

Assessing the Behavioral/Learning Model in Psychotherapy

7. Assessing the Behavioral/Learning Model in Psychotherapy

Behavioral therapy is a popular way to treat certain psychological disorders. But how well does it work? And is it the best choice? In this lesson, we'll explore the strengths and weaknesses of the behavioral model of abnormality.

Sources of Biological Abnormalities: Genetics & Evolution

8. Sources of Biological Abnormalities: Genetics & Evolution

There are many factors that can affect a person's mental health. How do elements like genetics and evolution play a role in psychology? In this lesson, we'll look closer at how genetics and evolution can affect mental illness.

Assessing the Biological Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

9. Assessing the Biological Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

What causes mental illness? Some psychologists believe that psychological disorders are caused by physical problems. In this lesson, we'll assess the strengths and limitations of the biological model of abnormality.

The Sociocultural Model and Abnormal Functioning

10. The Sociocultural Model and Abnormal Functioning

There are many theories on what causes psychological issues. In this lesson, we'll explore the sociocultural model of abnormality, including what it is, what some key components of the theory are, and how sociocultural theorists treat abnormality.

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Sociocultural Model

11. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Sociocultural Model

How much of an impact do society and culture have on mental illness? Proponents of the sociocultural model believe that they play a major part. But there are both strengths and weaknesses of this model, which we'll examine in this lesson.

Physiological Causes & Explanations for Mental Illness

12. Physiological Causes & Explanations for Mental Illness

There are many factors that can affect a person's mental health, including physiological issues. In this lesson, we'll look at three major physical causes of psychological problems: infection, malnutrition, and metal poisoning.

The Cognitive Model in Psychology and Abnormal Functioning

13. The Cognitive Model in Psychology and Abnormal Functioning

Everyone has thoughts and beliefs. But how do those thoughts affect your mental health? In this lesson, we'll seek an answer to that question in the cognitive model of abnormal psychology and look closer at the A-B-C theory of processing.

Assessing the Cognitive Model in Psychology: Strengths and Weaknesses

14. Assessing the Cognitive Model in Psychology: Strengths and Weaknesses

The cognitive model of abnormality blames a person's thoughts for their psychological problems. But what makes it better than other psychological models? In this lesson, we'll look at the strengths and limitations of the cognitive model.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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