Ch 1: Theories of Classroom Discipline & Managing Behavior

About This Chapter

There is more than one way to approach behavior management and classroom discipline, and understanding related theories can help you keep your students under control. This chapter discusses different disciplinary theories and approaches you can try.

Theories of Classroom Discipline & Managing Behavior - Chapter Summary

Our instructors have created this chapter to guide you through the various approaches, models, and theories about classroom discipline and how to manage behavior. A few of the topics addressed in this chapter include:

  • Classroom discipline philosophy
  • The differences between democrative and assertive discipline
  • The Law of Effect
  • Overview of behaviorism
  • Gordon's Classroom Management Theory
  • Social discipline and Dreikurs' Model
  • Classroom management and Glasser's Choice Theory
  • Methods of positive reinforcement
  • Designing a classroom management personal philosophy

Each lesson focuses on a single topic, making it easier to understand each individual theory about classroom discipline and behavior management. You can go through all of the lessons to gain a broader understanding of this subject, or you can go to specific lessons if you want to brush up on a particular topic. Our information is available around the clock, so you have unrestricted access to these lessons whenever you need them.

How It Helps

  • Increases awareness: You'll be presented with a full range of behavior management and classroom discipline theories, some of which you may not be aware of, giving you new insights on how to approach these issues in your classroom.
  • Provides practical examples: Instead of just telling you the theories, our lessons go over the theoretical concepts and show you how to implement them directly into your daily teaching routine.
  • Well-researched guidelines: All of our chapters are made by field experts and fellow educators, so you can be certain the information presented here is accurate, up-to-date, and has been tested in real classroom settings.

Skills Covered

By the end of this chapter, you will be ready to:

  • Describe a philosophy of classroom discipline
  • Understand different approaches to discipline in the classroom
  • Identify behavioral theory
  • Integrate the practical teachings of behaviorism in the classroom
  • Analyze the applications of Gordon's Classroom Management Theory
  • Improve social discipline with Dreikurs' Model
  • Implement Glasser's Choice Theory
  • Define how positive reinforcement works in the classroom
  • Examine how to build a personal classroom management philosophy

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: Theories of Classroom Discipline & Managing Behavior
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Philosophy of Discipline in the Classroom

1. Philosophy of Discipline in the Classroom

An effective philosophy of discipline for the classroom can make the difference between stunning success and disaster. In this lesson, we'll explore what it is and what elements make up an effective philosophy of discipline.

Assertive vs. Democratic Discipline in Classrooms

2. Assertive vs. Democratic Discipline in Classrooms

How should students be disciplined in the classroom? What method brings about the best results? This lesson will describe and differentiate between assertive discipline and democratic discipline. Examples and strategies for using both approaches will also be provided.

Behavioral Theory: Thorndike and the Law of Effect

3. Behavioral Theory: Thorndike and the Law of Effect

How can outside forces change the way we behave? Why are people's actions shaped by rewards, such as money or good grades, or punishments, such as losing money or feeling pain? This lesson is an introduction to the famous psychologist Thorndike and his foundational research on why consequences of behavior, such as rewards or punishments, affect our future choices.

Behaviorism: Overview & Practical Teaching Examples

4. Behaviorism: Overview & Practical Teaching Examples

How can teachers use rewards and punishments to guide student behavior and learning? In this lesson, we will look at how behaviorism applies to the classroom, including the concepts of reinforcement, punishment, and extinction.

Applying Gordon's Classroom Management Theory to Discipline

5. Applying Gordon's Classroom Management Theory to Discipline

In this lesson, we explore Gordon's theory of classroom management and discover the proper ways to foster mutually beneficial relationships and how to manage discipline in the classroom.

Dreikurs' Model of Social Discipline in Classrooms

6. Dreikurs' Model of Social Discipline in Classrooms

Have you ever had that one student who just could not behave in class? Dreikurs' model of social discipline may give you the information and skills you need to eliminate behavior issues in the classroom for good.

Applying Glasser's Choice Theory to Classroom Management

7. Applying Glasser's Choice Theory to Classroom Management

In this lesson, we investigate the work of the American psychiatrist William Glasser and his pioneering choice theory and how to apply it in a classroom setting.

Positive Reinforcement in the Classroom

8. Positive Reinforcement in the Classroom

Through his work with animals, B.F. Skinner proved that reinforcements change behavior. Let's learn more about using positive reinforcements in the classroom.

Developing a Personal Philosophy of Classroom Management

9. Developing a Personal Philosophy of Classroom Management

Classroom management is one of the most important aspects of teaching. Your system will depend largely on your personal beliefs and feelings. This lesson details how you can develop a philosophy for successful classroom management.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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